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4Network Working Group                                             F. Cao
5Internet-Draft                                                   J. Peng
6Intended status: Informational                                  Y. Zhang
7Expires: September 6, 2011                                  China Mobile
8                                                           March 5, 2011
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11  A Uniform Resource Name (URN) Namespace for Media Content Naming and
12                      Delivery: Problem Statement
13                   draft-cao-urn-media-content-naming
14
15Abstract
16
17   Uniform Resource Names (URNs) have been used to serve as persistent
18   resource identifiers in multiple scenarios.  There are some
19   experimental informal namespaces proposed to extend URN to help the
20   media content delivery and sharing, such as peer-to-peer networks.
21   This document investigates the current efforts based on URN, analyzes
22   the basic requirements for URN extensions to satisfy the content
23   delivery, and outlines the options to provide more functions such as
24   content search with the help of URN extensions.
25
26Status of this Memo
27
28   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
29   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.
30
31   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
32   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
33   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
34   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.
35
36   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
37   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
38   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
39   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
40
41   This Internet-Draft will expire on September 6, 2011.
42
43Copyright Notice
44
45   Copyright (c) 2011 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
46   document authors.  All rights reserved.
47
48   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
49   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
50   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
51   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
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60   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
61   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
62   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
63   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
64   described in the Simplified BSD License.
65
66
67Table of Contents
68
69   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
70   2.  Requirements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
71     2.1.  How can content types be reflected? . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
72     2.2.  how can content types be categorized? . . . . . . . . . . . 4
73     2.3.  extension of content naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
74     2.4.  the uniqueness of content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
75     2.5.  the persistence of content  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
76     2.6.  self-certifying consideration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
77     2.7.  Changes on the name resolution  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
78     2.8.  scalability on content naming and name resolution . . . . . 4
79   3.  Enhancement on the related functions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
80   4.  Conclusion and Recommendation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
81   5.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
82   6.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
83   7.  Contributors  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
84   8.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
85   9.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
86     9.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
87     9.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
88   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
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1161.  Introduction
117
118   Uniform Resource Names (URNs) have been used to serve as persistent
119   resource identifiers in multiple scenarios, such as
120
121   o  ISBN for books
122
123   o  ISSN for serials
124
125   o  National Bibliography Number for anything else in National
126      Libraries' collections
127
128   There are some experimental informal namespaces proposed for URN to
129   help the media content delivery such as peer-to-peer networks.  For
130   example,
131
132   o  urn:ed2k for Amule
133
134   o  urn:bith fro Azureus, uTorrent, BitComet and others
135
136   o  urn:sha1 for LimeWire, Shareaza and others
137
138   In order to make media content sharing and delivery compatible and
139   consistent through various applications and implementations, the
140   common standardized scheme must be provided for content naming and
141   accepted among differe.  URN can be a good component for content
142   naming with new registrations and extensions in URN, because of the
143   wide recognization of URN and some successful practices based on
144   experientmal URN extensions.
145
146   This document investigates the current efforts based on URN, analyzes
147   the basic requirements for URN extensions to satisfy content sharing
148   and delivery, and outlines the options to provide more functions such
149   as content search with the help of URN extensions.
150
151
1522.  Requirements
153
154   This section describes the common requirement faced by content naming
155   in content sharing and delivery.  URN is analyzed here to check if it
156   can be extended to satisfy these requirements
157
1582.1.  How can content types be reflected?
159
160   It is useful and needed to understand the content types directly from
161   URN, which can make it more human readable and more searchable for
162   content sharing and delivery.
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1722.2.  how can content types be categorized?
173
174   There must be a consistent and extensible way to define content
175   types, which should be able to prevent the avoidable conflicts and
176   confusions.
177
1782.3.  extension of content naming
179
180   There must be a consistent and extensible way to add new content
181   types, which should be able to prevent the avoidable conflicts and
182   confusions.
183
1842.4.  the uniqueness of content
185
186   The uniqueness of content must be provided in content naming to avoid
187   any ambiguity and confusions in content sharing and delivery.
188
189   There are several options to present the uniqueness of content.  For
190   example, cryptographical hashes can be used to generate the global
191   unique identifiers which can be included in URN.
192
1932.5.  the persistence of content
194
195   The persistence of content naming is dependent upon a number of
196   factors.  In addition, several fields in the metadata may help to
197   indicate the persistence, and even outline the relationships.
198
1992.6.  self-certifying consideration
200
201   Self-certifying content naming can help to prevent the potential
202   threats, such as spoofing and man-in-the-middle atacks.  Therefore,
203   self-certifying content naming is among the common requirements.
204
2052.7.  Changes on the name resolution
206
207   Content sharing and delivery must rely on the name resolution to
208   identify where and how to obtain the desired content.  So the new
209   registrations and extensions in URN must be recognized and supported
210   by the name resolution system.
211
2122.8.  scalability on content naming and name resolution
213
214   The volume for content sharing and delivery has been dramatically
215   increased in the past several years.  So the load on name resolution
216   system will be increased too when new content naming can be
217   supported.  Therefore, the scalability of name resolution systems has
218   been a critical requirement to satisfy the demands of content sharing
219   and delivery.
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2283.  Enhancement on the related functions
229
230   There are a number of functions related to media content sharing and
231   delivery.  For example, content search is essential to locate the
232   proper information before the actual sharing and deliver.  The
233   mapping of the desired media content among a number of applications
234   is critical for prompt delivery and sharing.  Content security
235   protection is also critical to guarantee the integrity and privacy.
236
237   With the help the new registrations and extension of URN, content
238   search can be built upon some existing solutions.  For example,
239   Location-to-Service Translation Protocol (LoST) can be enhanced to
240   act as the content search method by including new factors such as the
241   new fields introduced into URN.  In addition to geo-location
242   information covered by LoST, these new fields inside URN extension
243   can give content search more coverage and global consistence.
244
245
2464.  Conclusion and Recommendation
247
248   There are some experimental informal namespaces proposed for URN to
249   help the content delivery such as peer-to-peer networks.  In order to
250   make content sharing and delivery compatible and consistent through
251   various applications and implementations, there must be the commonly
252   accepted standardized scheme for content naming.
253
254   This document investigates the current efforts based on URN, analyzes
255   the basic requirements for URN extensions to satisfy the content
256   delivery, and outlines the options to provide more functions such as
257   content search with the help of URN extensions.
258
259
2605.  Security Considerations
261
262   TBD
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2656.  IANA Considerations
266
267   TBD.
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2707.  Contributors
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2848.  Acknowledgements
285
286   TBD
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2899.  References
290
2919.1.  Normative References
292
293   [RFC3406]  Daigle, L., van Gulik, D., Iannella, R., and P. Faltstrom,
294              "Uniform Resource Names (URN) Namespace Definition
295              Mechanisms", BCP 66, RFC 3406, October 2002.
296
297   [RFC3986]  Berners-Lee, T., Fielding, R., and L. Masinter, "Uniform
298              Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax", STD 66,
299              RFC 3986, January 2005.
300
301   [RFC2141]  Moats, R., "URN Syntax", RFC 2141, May 1997.
302
303   [RFC2483]  Mealling, M. and R. Daniel, "URI Resolution Services
304              Necessary for URN Resolution", RFC 2483, January 1999.
305
306   [RFC5222]  Hardie, T., Newton, A., Schulzrinne, H., and H.
307              Tschofenig, "LoST: A Location-to-Service Translation
308              Protocol", RFC 5222, August 2008.
309
3109.2.  Informative References
311
312   [RFC3044]  Rozenfeld, S., "Using The ISSN (International Serial
313              Standard Number) as URN (Uniform Resource Names) within an
314              ISSN-URN Namespace", RFC 3044, January 2001.
315
316   [RFC3187]  Hakala, J. and H. Walravens, "Using International Standard
317              Book Numbers as Uniform Resource Names", RFC 3187,
318              October 2001.
319
320   [RFC3188]  Hakala, J., "Using National Bibliography Numbers as
321              Uniform Resource Names", RFC 3188, October 2001.
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340Authors' Addresses
341
342   Feng Cao
343   China Mobile
344   1525 McCarthy Blvd.
345   Milpitas, California  95035
346   USA
347
348   Email: fjscao@gmail.com
349   URI:
350
351
352   Jing Peng
353   China Mobile
354   Unit2, 28 Xuanwumenxi Ave
355   Xianwu, Beijing  100053
356   China
357
358   Email: pengjing@chinamobile.com
359
360
361   Yunfei Zhang
362   China Mobile
363   Unit2, 28 Xuanwumenxi Ave
364   Xianwu, Beijing  100053
365   China
366
367   Email: zhangyunfei@chinamobile.com
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