Ignore:
Timestamp:
Apr 2, 2010, 10:42:06 AM (9 years ago)
Author:
julian.reschke@…
Message:

Re-arrange the three format examples so that it becomes clearer what the MUST-send format is.

File:
1 edited

Legend:

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  • draft-ietf-httpbis/latest/p1-messaging.xml

    r803 r804  
    16681668<t>
    16691669   HTTP applications have historically allowed three different formats
    1670    for the representation of date/time stamps:
    1671 </t>
    1672 <figure><artwork type="example">
    1673   Sun, 06 Nov 1994 08:49:37 GMT  ; RFC 1123
    1674   Sunday, 06-Nov-94 08:49:37 GMT ; obsolete RFC 850 format
    1675   Sun Nov  6 08:49:37 1994       ; ANSI C's asctime() format
    1676 </artwork></figure>
     1670   for the representation of date/time stamps.
     1671</t>
    16771672<t>
    16781673   The first format is preferred as an Internet standard and represents
    1679    a fixed-length subset of that defined by <xref target="RFC1123"/>. The
    1680    other formats are described here only for
    1681    compatibility with obsolete implementations.
     1674   a fixed-length subset of that defined by <xref target="RFC1123"/>:
     1675</t>
     1676<figure><artwork type="example" x:indent-with="  ">
     1677Sun, 06 Nov 1994 08:49:37 GMT  ; RFC 1123
     1678</artwork></figure>
     1679<t>
     1680   The other formats are described here only for compatibility with obsolete
     1681   implementations.
     1682</t>
     1683<figure><artwork type="example" x:indent-with="  ">
     1684Sunday, 06-Nov-94 08:49:37 GMT ; obsolete RFC 850 format
     1685Sun Nov  6 08:49:37 1994       ; ANSI C's asctime() format
     1686</artwork></figure>
     1687<t>
    16821688   HTTP/1.1 clients and servers that parse the date value &MUST; accept
    16831689   all three formats (for compatibility with HTTP/1.0), though they &MUST;
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