Changeset 544


Ignore:
Timestamp:
Mar 6, 2009, 8:52:15 PM (11 years ago)
Author:
fielding@…
Message:

editorial: another pass at intro streamlining, removed unnecessary
references to FTP, Gopher, NNTP, and WAIS.

Location:
draft-ietf-httpbis/latest
Files:
2 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • draft-ietf-httpbis/latest/p1-messaging.html

    r543 r544  
    671671      <p id="rfc.section.1.p.1">The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is an application-level request/response protocol that uses extensible semantics and
    672672         MIME-like message payloads for flexible interaction with network-based hypertext information systems. HTTP relies upon the
    673          Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) standard <a href="#RFC3986" id="rfc.xref.RFC3986.1"><cite title="Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax">[RFC3986]</cite></a> to indicate resource targets and relationships between resources. Messages are passed in a format similar to that used by
    674          Internet mail <a href="#RFC5322" id="rfc.xref.RFC5322.1"><cite title="Internet Message Format">[RFC5322]</cite></a> and the Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) <a href="#RFC2045" id="rfc.xref.RFC2045.1"><cite title="Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) Part One: Format of Internet Message Bodies">[RFC2045]</cite></a> (see <a href="p3-payload.html#differences.between.http.entities.and.rfc.2045.entities" title="Differences Between HTTP Entities and RFC 2045 Entities">Appendix A</a> of <a href="#Part3" id="rfc.xref.Part3.1"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 3: Message Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part3]</cite></a> for the differences between HTTP and MIME messages).
    675       </p>
    676       <p id="rfc.section.1.p.2">HTTP is a generic interface protocol for informations systems. It is designed to hide the details of how a service is implemented
     673         Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) standard <a href="#RFC3986" id="rfc.xref.RFC3986.1"><cite title="Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax">[RFC3986]</cite></a> to indicate request targets and relationships between resources. Messages are passed in a format similar to that used by Internet
     674         mail <a href="#RFC5322" id="rfc.xref.RFC5322.1"><cite title="Internet Message Format">[RFC5322]</cite></a> and the Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) <a href="#RFC2045" id="rfc.xref.RFC2045.1"><cite title="Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) Part One: Format of Internet Message Bodies">[RFC2045]</cite></a> (see <a href="p3-payload.html#differences.between.http.entities.and.rfc.2045.entities" title="Differences Between HTTP Entities and RFC 2045 Entities">Appendix A</a> of <a href="#Part3" id="rfc.xref.Part3.1"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 3: Message Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part3]</cite></a> for the differences between HTTP and MIME messages).
     675      </p>
     676      <p id="rfc.section.1.p.2">HTTP is a generic interface protocol for information systems. It is designed to hide the details of how a service is implemented
    677677         by presenting a uniform interface to clients that is independent of the types of resources provided. Likewise, servers do
    678678         not need to be aware of each client's purpose: an HTTP request can be considered in isolation rather than being associated
     
    680680         effectively in many different contexts and for which implementations can evolve independently over time.
    681681      </p>
    682       <p id="rfc.section.1.p.3">HTTP is also designed for use as a generic protocol for translating communication to and from other Internet information systems,
    683          such as USENET news services via NNTP <a href="#RFC3977" id="rfc.xref.RFC3977.1"><cite title="Network News Transfer Protocol (NNTP)">[RFC3977]</cite></a>, file services via FTP <a href="#RFC959" id="rfc.xref.RFC959.1"><cite title="File Transfer Protocol">[RFC959]</cite></a>, Gopher <a href="#RFC1436" id="rfc.xref.RFC1436.1"><cite title="The Internet Gopher Protocol (a distributed document search and retrieval protocol)">[RFC1436]</cite></a>, and WAIS <a href="#WAIS" id="rfc.xref.WAIS.1"><cite title="WAIS Interface Protocol Prototype Functional Specification (v1.5)">[WAIS]</cite></a>. HTTP proxies and gateways provide access to alternative information services by translating their diverse protocols into
    684          a hypertext format that can be viewed and manipulated by clients in the same way as HTTP services.
     682      <p id="rfc.section.1.p.3">HTTP is also designed for use as a generic protocol for translating communication to and from other Internet information systems.
     683         HTTP proxies and gateways provide access to alternative information services by translating their diverse protocols into a
     684         hypertext format that can be viewed and manipulated by clients in the same way as HTTP services.
    685685      </p>
    686686      <p id="rfc.section.1.p.4">One consequence of HTTP flexibility is that the protocol cannot be defined in terms of what occurs behind the interface. Instead,
    687687         we are limited to defining the syntax of communication, the intent of received communication, and the expected behavior of
    688          recipients. If the communication is considered in isolation, then successful actions should be reflected in the observable
    689          interface provided by servers. However, since many clients are potentially acting in parallel and perhaps at cross-purposes,
    690          it would be meaningless to require that such behavior be observable.
    691       </p>
    692       <p id="rfc.section.1.p.5">This document is Part 1 of the seven-part specification of HTTP, defining the protocol referred to as "HTTP/1.1" and obsoleting <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.1"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2616]</cite></a>. Part 1 defines the URI schemes specific to HTTP-based resources, overall network operation, transport protocol connection
    693          management, and HTTP message framing and forwarding requirements. Our goal is to define all of the mechanisms necessary for
    694          HTTP message handling that are independent of message semantics, thereby defining the complete set of requirements for a message
    695          parser and transparent message-forwarding intermediaries.
     688         recipients. If the communication is considered in isolation, then successful actions should be reflected in corresponding
     689         changes to the observable interface provided by servers. However, since multiple clients may act in parallel and perhaps at
     690         cross-purposes, we cannot require that such changes be observable beyond the scope of a single response.
     691      </p>
     692      <p id="rfc.section.1.p.5">This document is Part 1 of the seven-part specification of HTTP, defining the protocol referred to as "HTTP/1.1" and obsoleting <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.1"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2616]</cite></a>. Part 1 describes the architectural elements that are used or referred to in HTTP and defines the URI schemes specific to
     693         HTTP-based resources, overall network operation, connection management, and HTTP message framing and forwarding requirements.
     694         Our goal is to define all of the mechanisms necessary for HTTP message handling that are independent of message semantics,
     695         thereby defining the complete set of requirements for message parsers and message-forwarding intermediaries.
    696696      </p>
    697697      <h2 id="rfc.section.1.1"><a href="#rfc.section.1.1">1.1</a>&nbsp;<a id="intro.requirements" href="#intro.requirements">Requirements</a></h2>
     
    22312231      <h2 id="rfc.references.2"><a href="#rfc.section.12.2" id="rfc.section.12.2">12.2</a> Informative References
    22322232      </h2>
    2233       <table summary="Informative References">                                                 
     2233      <table summary="Informative References">                                         
    22342234         <tr>
    22352235            <td class="reference"><b id="Kri2001">[Kri2001]</b></td>
     
    22592259         </tr>
    22602260         <tr>
    2261             <td class="reference"><b id="RFC1436">[RFC1436]</b></td>
    2262             <td class="top"><a title="University of Minnesota, Computer and Information Services">Anklesaria, F.</a>, <a title="University of Minnesota, Computer and Information Services">McCahill, M.</a>, <a title="University of Minnesota, Computer and Information Services">Lindner, P.</a>, <a title="University of Minnesota, Computer and Information Services">Johnson, D.</a>, <a title="University of Minnesota, Computer and Information Services">Torrey, D.</a>, and <a title="University of Minnesota, Computer and Information Services">B. Alberti</a>, “<a href="http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1436">The Internet Gopher Protocol (a distributed document search and retrieval protocol)</a>”, RFC&nbsp;1436, March&nbsp;1993.
    2263             </td>
    2264          </tr>
    2265          <tr>
    22662261            <td class="reference"><b id="RFC1900">[RFC1900]</b></td>
    22672262            <td class="top"><a title="CERN, Computing and Networks Division">Carpenter, B.</a> and <a title="cisco Systems">Y. Rekhter</a>, “<a href="http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1900">Renumbering Needs Work</a>”, RFC&nbsp;1900, February&nbsp;1996.
     
    23192314         </tr>
    23202315         <tr>
    2321             <td class="reference"><b id="RFC3977">[RFC3977]</b></td>
    2322             <td class="top"><a title="THUS plc">Feather, C.</a>, “<a href="http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3977">Network News Transfer Protocol (NNTP)</a>”, RFC&nbsp;3977, October&nbsp;2006.
    2323             </td>
    2324          </tr>
    2325          <tr>
    23262316            <td class="reference"><b id="RFC4288">[RFC4288]</b></td>
    23272317            <td class="top"><a title="Sun Microsystems">Freed, N.</a> and <a>J. Klensin</a>, “<a href="http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4288">Media Type Specifications and Registration Procedures</a>”, BCP&nbsp;13, RFC&nbsp;4288, December&nbsp;2005.
     
    23392329         </tr>
    23402330         <tr>
    2341             <td class="reference"><b id="RFC959">[RFC959]</b></td>
    2342             <td class="top">Postel, J. and J. Reynolds, “<a href="http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc959">File Transfer Protocol</a>”, STD&nbsp;9, RFC&nbsp;959, October&nbsp;1985.
    2343             </td>
    2344          </tr>
    2345          <tr>
    23462331            <td class="reference"><b id="Spe">[Spe]</b></td>
    23472332            <td class="top">Spero, S., “<a href="http://sunsite.unc.edu/mdma-release/http-prob.html">Analysis of HTTP Performance Problems</a>”, &lt;<a href="http://sunsite.unc.edu/mdma-release/http-prob.html">http://sunsite.unc.edu/mdma-release/http-prob.html</a>&gt;.
     
    23522337            <td class="top"><a title="USC/Information Sciences Institute">Touch, J.</a>, <a title="USC/Information Sciences Institute">Heidemann, J.</a>, and <a title="USC/Information Sciences Institute">K. Obraczka</a>, “<a href="http://www.isi.edu/touch/pubs/http-perf96/">Analysis of HTTP Performance</a>”, ISI Research Report&nbsp;ISI/RR-98-463, Aug&nbsp;1998, &lt;<a href="http://www.isi.edu/touch/pubs/http-perf96/">http://www.isi.edu/touch/pubs/http-perf96/</a>&gt;.<br>(original report dated Aug. 1996)
    23532338            </td>
    2354          </tr>
    2355          <tr>
    2356             <td class="reference"><b id="WAIS">[WAIS]</b></td>
    2357             <td class="top">Davis, F., Kahle, B., Morris, H., Salem, J., Shen, T., Wang, R., Sui, J., and M. Grinbaum, “WAIS Interface Protocol Prototype Functional Specification (v1.5)”, Thinking Machines Corporation, April&nbsp;1990.</td>
    23582339         </tr>
    23592340      </table>
     
    30182999      </ul>
    30193000      <h1 id="rfc.index"><a href="#rfc.index">Index</a></h1>
    3020       <p class="noprint"><a href="#rfc.index.A">A</a> <a href="#rfc.index.C">C</a> <a href="#rfc.index.D">D</a> <a href="#rfc.index.E">E</a> <a href="#rfc.index.G">G</a> <a href="#rfc.index.H">H</a> <a href="#rfc.index.I">I</a> <a href="#rfc.index.K">K</a> <a href="#rfc.index.M">M</a> <a href="#rfc.index.N">N</a> <a href="#rfc.index.O">O</a> <a href="#rfc.index.P">P</a> <a href="#rfc.index.R">R</a> <a href="#rfc.index.S">S</a> <a href="#rfc.index.T">T</a> <a href="#rfc.index.U">U</a> <a href="#rfc.index.V">V</a> <a href="#rfc.index.W">W</a>
     3001      <p class="noprint"><a href="#rfc.index.A">A</a> <a href="#rfc.index.C">C</a> <a href="#rfc.index.D">D</a> <a href="#rfc.index.E">E</a> <a href="#rfc.index.G">G</a> <a href="#rfc.index.H">H</a> <a href="#rfc.index.I">I</a> <a href="#rfc.index.K">K</a> <a href="#rfc.index.M">M</a> <a href="#rfc.index.N">N</a> <a href="#rfc.index.O">O</a> <a href="#rfc.index.P">P</a> <a href="#rfc.index.R">R</a> <a href="#rfc.index.S">S</a> <a href="#rfc.index.T">T</a> <a href="#rfc.index.U">U</a> <a href="#rfc.index.V">V</a>
    30213002      </p>
    30223003      <div class="print2col">
     
    32533234                  <li class="indline1"><em>RFC1123</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC1123.1">3.2.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC1123"><b>12.2</b></a></li>
    32543235                  <li class="indline1"><em>RFC1305</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC1305.1">8.3</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC1305"><b>12.2</b></a></li>
    3255                   <li class="indline1"><em>RFC1436</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC1436.1">1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC1436"><b>12.2</b></a></li>
    32563236                  <li class="indline1"><em>RFC1900</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC1900.1">2.1.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC1900.2">10.4</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC1900"><b>12.2</b></a></li>
    32573237                  <li class="indline1"><em>RFC1945</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#RFC1945"><b>12.2</b></a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC1945.1">B</a></li>
     
    32693249                  <li class="indline1"><em>RFC2965</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC2965.1">4.2</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC2965"><b>12.2</b></a></li>
    32703250                  <li class="indline1"><em>RFC3864</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3864.1">9.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC3864"><b>12.2</b></a></li>
    3271                   <li class="indline1"><em>RFC3977</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3977.1">1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC3977"><b>12.2</b></a></li>
    32723251                  <li class="indline1"><em>RFC3986</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.1">1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.2">2.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.3">2.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.4">2.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.5">2.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.6">2.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.7">2.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.8">2.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.9">2.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.10">2.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.11">2.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.12">2.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.13">2.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.14">2.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.15">2.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.16">2.1.3</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.17">5.1.2</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC3986"><b>12.1</b></a><ul class="ind">
    32733252                        <li class="indline1"><em>Section 2.1</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.16">2.1.3</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.17">5.1.2</a></li>
     
    32963275                     </ul>
    32973276                  </li>
    3298                   <li class="indline1"><em>RFC959</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC959.1">1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC959"><b>12.2</b></a></li>
    32993277               </ul>
    33003278            </li>
     
    33303308               </ul>
    33313309            </li>
    3332             <li class="indline0"><a id="rfc.index.W" href="#rfc.index.W"><b>W</b></a><ul class="ind">
    3333                   <li class="indline1"><em>WAIS</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.WAIS.1">1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#WAIS"><b>12.2</b></a></li>
    3334                </ul>
    3335             </li>
    33363310         </ul>
    33373311      </div>
  • draft-ietf-httpbis/latest/p1-messaging.xml

    r543 r544  
    231231   message payloads for flexible interaction with network-based hypertext
    232232   information systems. HTTP relies upon the Uniform Resource Identifier (URI)
    233    standard <xref target="RFC3986"/> to indicate resource targets and
     233   standard <xref target="RFC3986"/> to indicate request targets and
    234234   relationships between resources.
    235235   Messages are passed in a format similar to that used by Internet mail
     
    239239</t>
    240240<t>
    241    HTTP is a generic interface protocol for informations systems. It is
     241   HTTP is a generic interface protocol for information systems. It is
    242242   designed to hide the details of how a service is implemented by presenting
    243243   a uniform interface to clients that is independent of the types of
     
    251251<t>
    252252   HTTP is also designed for use as a generic protocol for translating
    253    communication to and from other Internet information systems, such as
    254    USENET news services via NNTP <xref target="RFC3977"/>,
    255    file services via FTP <xref target="RFC959"/>,
    256    Gopher <xref target="RFC1436"/>, and WAIS <xref target="WAIS"/>.
     253   communication to and from other Internet information systems.
    257254   HTTP proxies and gateways provide access to alternative information
    258255   services by translating their diverse protocols into a hypertext
     
    261258</t>
    262259<t>
    263    One consequence of HTTP flexibility is that the protocol cannot be defined
    264    in terms of what occurs behind the interface. Instead, we are
    265    limited to defining the syntax of communication, the intent
    266    of received communication, and the expected behavior of recipients. If
    267    the communication is considered in isolation, then successful actions
    268    should be reflected in the observable interface provided by servers.
    269    However, since many clients are potentially acting in parallel and
    270    perhaps at cross-purposes, it would be meaningless to require that such
    271    behavior be observable.
     260   One consequence of HTTP flexibility is that the protocol cannot be
     261   defined in terms of what occurs behind the interface. Instead, we
     262   are limited to defining the syntax of communication, the intent
     263   of received communication, and the expected behavior of recipients.
     264   If the communication is considered in isolation, then successful
     265   actions should be reflected in corresponding changes to the
     266   observable interface provided by servers. However, since multiple
     267   clients may act in parallel and perhaps at cross-purposes, we
     268   cannot require that such changes be observable beyond the scope
     269   of a single response.
    272270</t>
    273271<t>
     
    275273   defining the protocol referred to as "HTTP/1.1" and obsoleting
    276274   <xref target="RFC2616"/>.
    277    Part 1 defines the URI schemes specific to HTTP-based resources, overall
    278    network operation, transport protocol connection management, and HTTP
    279    message framing and forwarding requirements.
     275   Part 1 describes the architectural elements that are used or
     276   referred to in HTTP and defines the URI schemes specific to
     277   HTTP-based resources, overall network operation, connection
     278   management, and HTTP message framing and forwarding requirements.
    280279   Our goal is to define all of the mechanisms necessary for HTTP message
    281280   handling that are independent of message semantics, thereby defining the
    282    complete set of requirements for a message parser and transparent
     281   complete set of requirements for message parsers and
    283282   message-forwarding intermediaries.
    284283</t>
     
    34813480</reference>
    34823481
    3483 <reference anchor="RFC959">
    3484   <front>
    3485     <title abbrev="File Transfer Protocol">File Transfer Protocol</title>
    3486     <author initials="J." surname="Postel" fullname="J. Postel">
    3487       <organization>Information Sciences Institute (ISI)</organization>
    3488     </author>
    3489     <author initials="J." surname="Reynolds" fullname="J. Reynolds">
    3490       <organization/>
    3491     </author>
    3492     <date month="October" year="1985"/>
    3493   </front>
    3494   <seriesInfo name="STD" value="9"/>
    3495   <seriesInfo name="RFC" value="959"/>
    3496 </reference>
    3497 
    34983482<reference anchor="RFC1123">
    34993483  <front>
     
    35213505</reference>
    35223506
    3523 <reference anchor="RFC1436">
    3524   <front>
    3525     <title abbrev="Gopher">The Internet Gopher Protocol (a distributed document search and retrieval protocol)</title>
    3526     <author initials="F." surname="Anklesaria" fullname="Farhad Anklesaria">
    3527       <organization>University of Minnesota, Computer and Information Services</organization>
    3528       <address><email>fxa@boombox.micro.umn.edu</email></address>
    3529     </author>
    3530     <author initials="M." surname="McCahill" fullname="Mark McCahill">
    3531       <organization>University of Minnesota, Computer and Information Services</organization>
    3532       <address><email>mpm@boombox.micro.umn.edu</email></address>
    3533     </author>
    3534     <author initials="P." surname="Lindner" fullname="Paul Lindner">
    3535       <organization>University of Minnesota, Computer and Information Services</organization>
    3536       <address><email>lindner@boombox.micro.umn.edu</email></address>
    3537     </author>
    3538     <author initials="D." surname="Johnson" fullname="David Johnson">
    3539       <organization>University of Minnesota, Computer and Information Services</organization>
    3540       <address><email>dmj@boombox.micro.umn.edu</email></address>
    3541     </author>
    3542     <author initials="D." surname="Torrey" fullname="Daniel Torrey">
    3543       <organization>University of Minnesota, Computer and Information Services</organization>
    3544       <address><email>daniel@boombox.micro.umn.edu</email></address>
    3545     </author>
    3546     <author initials="B." surname="Alberti" fullname="Bob Alberti">
    3547       <organization>University of Minnesota, Computer and Information Services</organization>
    3548       <address><email>alberti@boombox.micro.umn.edu</email></address>
    3549     </author>
    3550     <date month="March" year="1993"/>
    3551   </front>
    3552   <seriesInfo name="RFC" value="1436"/>
    3553 </reference>
    3554 
    35553507<reference anchor="RFC1900">
    35563508  <front>
     
    37683720  <seriesInfo name='BCP' value='90' />
    37693721  <seriesInfo name='RFC' value='3864' />
    3770 </reference>
    3771 
    3772 <reference anchor='RFC3977'>
    3773   <front>
    3774     <title>Network News Transfer Protocol (NNTP)</title>
    3775     <author initials='C.' surname='Feather' fullname='C. Feather'>
    3776       <organization>THUS plc</organization>
    3777       <address><email>clive@demon.net</email></address>
    3778     </author>
    3779     <date year='2006' month='October' />
    3780   </front>
    3781   <seriesInfo name="RFC" value="3977"/>
    37823722</reference>
    37833723
     
    38833823</reference>
    38843824
    3885 <reference anchor="WAIS">
    3886   <front>
    3887     <title>WAIS Interface Protocol Prototype Functional Specification (v1.5)</title>
    3888     <author initials="F." surname="Davis" fullname="F. Davis">
    3889       <organization>Thinking Machines Corporation</organization>
    3890     </author>
    3891     <author initials="B." surname="Kahle" fullname="B. Kahle">
    3892       <organization>Thinking Machines Corporation</organization>
    3893     </author>
    3894     <author initials="H." surname="Morris" fullname="H. Morris">
    3895       <organization>Thinking Machines Corporation</organization>
    3896     </author>
    3897     <author initials="J." surname="Salem" fullname="J. Salem">
    3898       <organization>Thinking Machines Corporation</organization>
    3899     </author>
    3900     <author initials="T." surname="Shen" fullname="T. Shen">
    3901       <organization>Thinking Machines Corporation</organization>
    3902     </author>
    3903     <author initials="R." surname="Wang" fullname="R. Wang">
    3904       <organization>Thinking Machines Corporation</organization>
    3905     </author>
    3906     <author initials="J." surname="Sui" fullname="J. Sui">
    3907       <organization>Thinking Machines Corporation</organization>
    3908     </author>
    3909     <author initials="M." surname="Grinbaum" fullname="M. Grinbaum">
    3910       <organization>Thinking Machines Corporation</organization>
    3911     </author>
    3912     <date month="April" year="1990"/>
    3913   </front>
    3914   <seriesInfo name="Thinking Machines Corporation" value=""/>
    3915 </reference>
    3916 
    39173825</references>
    39183826
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