Ignore:
Timestamp:
10/11/08 21:32:01 (12 years ago)
Author:
fielding@…
Message:

move the terminology section to the back

File:
1 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • draft-ietf-httpbis/latest-roy/p1-messaging.xml

    r335 r337  
    306306</section>
    307307
    308 <section title="Terminology" anchor="intro.terminology">
    309 <t>
    310    This specification uses a number of terms to refer to the roles
    311    played by participants in, and objects of, the HTTP communication.
    312 </t>
    313 <t>
    314   <iref item="connection"/>
    315   <x:dfn>connection</x:dfn>
    316   <list>
    317     <t>
    318       A transport layer virtual circuit established between two programs
    319       for the purpose of communication.
    320     </t>
    321   </list>
    322 </t>
    323 <t>
    324   <iref item="message"/>
    325   <x:dfn>message</x:dfn>
    326   <list>
    327     <t>
    328       The basic unit of HTTP communication, consisting of a structured
    329       sequence of octets matching the syntax defined in <xref target="http.message"/> and
    330       transmitted via the connection.
    331     </t>
    332   </list>
    333 </t>
    334 <t>
    335   <iref item="request"/>
    336   <x:dfn>request</x:dfn>
    337   <list>
    338     <t>
    339       An HTTP request message, as defined in <xref target="request"/>.
    340     </t>
    341   </list>
    342 </t>
    343 <t>
    344   <iref item="response"/>
    345   <x:dfn>response</x:dfn>
    346   <list>
    347     <t>
    348       An HTTP response message, as defined in <xref target="response"/>.
    349     </t>
    350   </list>
    351 </t>
    352 <t>
    353   <iref item="resource"/>
    354   <x:dfn>resource</x:dfn>
    355   <list>
    356     <t>
    357       A network data object or service that can be identified by a URI,
    358       as defined in <xref target="uri"/>. Resources may be available in multiple
    359       representations (e.g. multiple languages, data formats, size, and
    360       resolutions) or vary in other ways.
    361     </t>
    362   </list>
    363 </t>
    364 <t>
    365   <iref item="entity"/>
    366   <x:dfn>entity</x:dfn>
    367   <list>
    368     <t>
    369       The information transferred as the payload of a request or
    370       response. An entity consists of metainformation in the form of
    371       entity-header fields and content in the form of an entity-body, as
    372       described in &entity;.
    373     </t>
    374   </list>
    375 </t>
    376 <t>
    377   <iref item="representation"/>
    378   <x:dfn>representation</x:dfn>
    379   <list>
    380     <t>
    381       An entity included with a response that is subject to content
    382       negotiation, as described in &content.negotiation;. There may exist multiple
    383       representations associated with a particular response status.
    384     </t>
    385   </list>
    386 </t>
    387 <t>
    388   <iref item="content negotiation"/>
    389   <x:dfn>content negotiation</x:dfn>
    390   <list>
    391     <t>
    392       The mechanism for selecting the appropriate representation when
    393       servicing a request, as described in &content.negotiation;. The
    394       representation of entities in any response can be negotiated
    395       (including error responses).
    396     </t>
    397   </list>
    398 </t>
    399 <t>
    400   <iref item="variant"/>
    401   <x:dfn>variant</x:dfn>
    402   <list>
    403     <t>
    404       A resource may have one, or more than one, representation(s)
    405       associated with it at any given instant. Each of these
    406       representations is termed a `variant'.  Use of the term `variant'
    407       does not necessarily imply that the resource is subject to content
    408       negotiation.
    409     </t>
    410   </list>
    411 </t>
    412 <t>
    413   <iref item="client"/>
    414   <x:dfn>client</x:dfn>
    415   <list>
    416     <t>
    417       A program that establishes connections for the purpose of sending
    418       requests.
    419     </t>
    420   </list>
    421 </t>
    422 <t>
    423   <iref item="user agent"/>
    424   <x:dfn>user agent</x:dfn>
    425   <list>
    426     <t>
    427       The client which initiates a request. These are often browsers,
    428       editors, spiders (web-traversing robots), or other end user tools.
    429     </t>
    430   </list>
    431 </t>
    432 <t>
    433   <iref item="server"/>
    434   <x:dfn>server</x:dfn>
    435   <list>
    436     <t>
    437       An application program that accepts connections in order to
    438       service requests by sending back responses. Any given program may
    439       be capable of being both a client and a server; our use of these
    440       terms refers only to the role being performed by the program for a
    441       particular connection, rather than to the program's capabilities
    442       in general. Likewise, any server may act as an origin server,
    443       proxy, gateway, or tunnel, switching behavior based on the nature
    444       of each request.
    445     </t>
    446   </list>
    447 </t>
    448 <t>
    449   <iref item="origin server"/>
    450   <x:dfn>origin server</x:dfn>
    451   <list>
    452     <t>
    453       The server on which a given resource resides or is to be created.
    454     </t>
    455   </list>
    456 </t>
    457 <t>
    458   <iref item="proxy"/>
    459   <x:dfn>proxy</x:dfn>
    460   <list>
    461     <t>
    462       An intermediary program which acts as both a server and a client
    463       for the purpose of making requests on behalf of other clients.
    464       Requests are serviced internally or by passing them on, with
    465       possible translation, to other servers. A proxy &MUST; implement
    466       both the client and server requirements of this specification. A
    467       "transparent proxy" is a proxy that does not modify the request or
    468       response beyond what is required for proxy authentication and
    469       identification. A "non-transparent proxy" is a proxy that modifies
    470       the request or response in order to provide some added service to
    471       the user agent, such as group annotation services, media type
    472       transformation, protocol reduction, or anonymity filtering. Except
    473       where either transparent or non-transparent behavior is explicitly
    474       stated, the HTTP proxy requirements apply to both types of
    475       proxies.
    476     </t>
    477   </list>
    478 </t>
    479 <t>
    480   <iref item="gateway"/>
    481   <x:dfn>gateway</x:dfn>
    482   <list>
    483     <t>
    484       A server which acts as an intermediary for some other server.
    485       Unlike a proxy, a gateway receives requests as if it were the
    486       origin server for the requested resource; the requesting client
    487       may not be aware that it is communicating with a gateway.
    488     </t>
    489   </list>
    490 </t>
    491 <t>
    492   <iref item="tunnel"/>
    493   <x:dfn>tunnel</x:dfn>
    494   <list>
    495     <t>
    496       An intermediary program which is acting as a blind relay between
    497       two connections. Once active, a tunnel is not considered a party
    498       to the HTTP communication, though the tunnel may have been
    499       initiated by an HTTP request. The tunnel ceases to exist when both
    500       ends of the relayed connections are closed.
    501     </t>
    502   </list>
    503 </t>
    504 <t>
    505   <iref item="cache"/>
    506   <x:dfn>cache</x:dfn>
    507   <list>
    508     <t>
    509       A program's local store of response messages and the subsystem
    510       that controls its message storage, retrieval, and deletion. A
    511       cache stores cacheable responses in order to reduce the response
    512       time and network bandwidth consumption on future, equivalent
    513       requests. Any client or server may include a cache, though a cache
    514       cannot be used by a server that is acting as a tunnel.
    515     </t>
    516   </list>
    517 </t>
    518 <t>
    519   <iref item="cacheable"/>
    520   <x:dfn>cacheable</x:dfn>
    521   <list>
    522     <t>
    523       A response is cacheable if a cache is allowed to store a copy of
    524       the response message for use in answering subsequent requests. The
    525       rules for determining the cacheability of HTTP responses are
    526       defined in &caching;. Even if a resource is cacheable, there may
    527       be additional constraints on whether a cache can use the cached
    528       copy for a particular request.
    529     </t>
    530   </list>
    531 </t>
    532 <t>
    533   <iref item="upstream"/>
    534   <iref item="downstream"/>
    535   <x:dfn>upstream</x:dfn>/<x:dfn>downstream</x:dfn>
    536   <list>
    537     <t>
    538       Upstream and downstream describe the flow of a message: all
    539       messages flow from upstream to downstream.
    540     </t>
    541   </list>
    542 </t>
    543 <t>
    544   <iref item="inbound"/>
    545   <iref item="outbound"/>
    546   <x:dfn>inbound</x:dfn>/<x:dfn>outbound</x:dfn>
    547   <list>
    548     <t>
    549       Inbound and outbound refer to the request and response paths for
    550       messages: "inbound" means "traveling toward the origin server",
    551       and "outbound" means "traveling toward the user agent"
    552     </t>
    553   </list>
    554 </t>
    555 </section>
    556 
    557308<section title="Overall Operation" anchor="intro.overall.operation">
    558309<t>
     
    46524403</section>
    46534404
     4405<section title="Terminology" anchor="intro.terminology">
     4406<t>
     4407   This specification uses a number of terms to refer to the roles
     4408   played by participants in, and objects of, the HTTP communication.
     4409</t>
     4410<t>
     4411  <iref item="connection"/>
     4412  <x:dfn>connection</x:dfn>
     4413  <list>
     4414    <t>
     4415      A transport layer virtual circuit established between two programs
     4416      for the purpose of communication.
     4417    </t>
     4418  </list>
     4419</t>
     4420<t>
     4421  <iref item="message"/>
     4422  <x:dfn>message</x:dfn>
     4423  <list>
     4424    <t>
     4425      The basic unit of HTTP communication, consisting of a structured
     4426      sequence of octets matching the syntax defined in <xref target="http.message"/> and
     4427      transmitted via the connection.
     4428    </t>
     4429  </list>
     4430</t>
     4431<t>
     4432  <iref item="request"/>
     4433  <x:dfn>request</x:dfn>
     4434  <list>
     4435    <t>
     4436      An HTTP request message, as defined in <xref target="request"/>.
     4437    </t>
     4438  </list>
     4439</t>
     4440<t>
     4441  <iref item="response"/>
     4442  <x:dfn>response</x:dfn>
     4443  <list>
     4444    <t>
     4445      An HTTP response message, as defined in <xref target="response"/>.
     4446    </t>
     4447  </list>
     4448</t>
     4449<t>
     4450  <iref item="resource"/>
     4451  <x:dfn>resource</x:dfn>
     4452  <list>
     4453    <t>
     4454      A network data object or service that can be identified by a URI,
     4455      as defined in <xref target="uri"/>. Resources may be available in multiple
     4456      representations (e.g. multiple languages, data formats, size, and
     4457      resolutions) or vary in other ways.
     4458    </t>
     4459  </list>
     4460</t>
     4461<t>
     4462  <iref item="entity"/>
     4463  <x:dfn>entity</x:dfn>
     4464  <list>
     4465    <t>
     4466      The information transferred as the payload of a request or
     4467      response. An entity consists of metainformation in the form of
     4468      entity-header fields and content in the form of an entity-body, as
     4469      described in &entity;.
     4470    </t>
     4471  </list>
     4472</t>
     4473<t>
     4474  <iref item="representation"/>
     4475  <x:dfn>representation</x:dfn>
     4476  <list>
     4477    <t>
     4478      An entity included with a response that is subject to content
     4479      negotiation, as described in &content.negotiation;. There may exist multiple
     4480      representations associated with a particular response status.
     4481    </t>
     4482  </list>
     4483</t>
     4484<t>
     4485  <iref item="content negotiation"/>
     4486  <x:dfn>content negotiation</x:dfn>
     4487  <list>
     4488    <t>
     4489      The mechanism for selecting the appropriate representation when
     4490      servicing a request, as described in &content.negotiation;. The
     4491      representation of entities in any response can be negotiated
     4492      (including error responses).
     4493    </t>
     4494  </list>
     4495</t>
     4496<t>
     4497  <iref item="variant"/>
     4498  <x:dfn>variant</x:dfn>
     4499  <list>
     4500    <t>
     4501      A resource may have one, or more than one, representation(s)
     4502      associated with it at any given instant. Each of these
     4503      representations is termed a `variant'.  Use of the term `variant'
     4504      does not necessarily imply that the resource is subject to content
     4505      negotiation.
     4506    </t>
     4507  </list>
     4508</t>
     4509<t>
     4510  <iref item="client"/>
     4511  <x:dfn>client</x:dfn>
     4512  <list>
     4513    <t>
     4514      A program that establishes connections for the purpose of sending
     4515      requests.
     4516    </t>
     4517  </list>
     4518</t>
     4519<t>
     4520  <iref item="user agent"/>
     4521  <x:dfn>user agent</x:dfn>
     4522  <list>
     4523    <t>
     4524      The client which initiates a request. These are often browsers,
     4525      editors, spiders (web-traversing robots), or other end user tools.
     4526    </t>
     4527  </list>
     4528</t>
     4529<t>
     4530  <iref item="server"/>
     4531  <x:dfn>server</x:dfn>
     4532  <list>
     4533    <t>
     4534      An application program that accepts connections in order to
     4535      service requests by sending back responses. Any given program may
     4536      be capable of being both a client and a server; our use of these
     4537      terms refers only to the role being performed by the program for a
     4538      particular connection, rather than to the program's capabilities
     4539      in general. Likewise, any server may act as an origin server,
     4540      proxy, gateway, or tunnel, switching behavior based on the nature
     4541      of each request.
     4542    </t>
     4543  </list>
     4544</t>
     4545<t>
     4546  <iref item="origin server"/>
     4547  <x:dfn>origin server</x:dfn>
     4548  <list>
     4549    <t>
     4550      The server on which a given resource resides or is to be created.
     4551    </t>
     4552  </list>
     4553</t>
     4554<t>
     4555  <iref item="proxy"/>
     4556  <x:dfn>proxy</x:dfn>
     4557  <list>
     4558    <t>
     4559      An intermediary program which acts as both a server and a client
     4560      for the purpose of making requests on behalf of other clients.
     4561      Requests are serviced internally or by passing them on, with
     4562      possible translation, to other servers. A proxy &MUST; implement
     4563      both the client and server requirements of this specification. A
     4564      "transparent proxy" is a proxy that does not modify the request or
     4565      response beyond what is required for proxy authentication and
     4566      identification. A "non-transparent proxy" is a proxy that modifies
     4567      the request or response in order to provide some added service to
     4568      the user agent, such as group annotation services, media type
     4569      transformation, protocol reduction, or anonymity filtering. Except
     4570      where either transparent or non-transparent behavior is explicitly
     4571      stated, the HTTP proxy requirements apply to both types of
     4572      proxies.
     4573    </t>
     4574  </list>
     4575</t>
     4576<t>
     4577  <iref item="gateway"/>
     4578  <x:dfn>gateway</x:dfn>
     4579  <list>
     4580    <t>
     4581      A server which acts as an intermediary for some other server.
     4582      Unlike a proxy, a gateway receives requests as if it were the
     4583      origin server for the requested resource; the requesting client
     4584      may not be aware that it is communicating with a gateway.
     4585    </t>
     4586  </list>
     4587</t>
     4588<t>
     4589  <iref item="tunnel"/>
     4590  <x:dfn>tunnel</x:dfn>
     4591  <list>
     4592    <t>
     4593      An intermediary program which is acting as a blind relay between
     4594      two connections. Once active, a tunnel is not considered a party
     4595      to the HTTP communication, though the tunnel may have been
     4596      initiated by an HTTP request. The tunnel ceases to exist when both
     4597      ends of the relayed connections are closed.
     4598    </t>
     4599  </list>
     4600</t>
     4601<t>
     4602  <iref item="cache"/>
     4603  <x:dfn>cache</x:dfn>
     4604  <list>
     4605    <t>
     4606      A program's local store of response messages and the subsystem
     4607      that controls its message storage, retrieval, and deletion. A
     4608      cache stores cacheable responses in order to reduce the response
     4609      time and network bandwidth consumption on future, equivalent
     4610      requests. Any client or server may include a cache, though a cache
     4611      cannot be used by a server that is acting as a tunnel.
     4612    </t>
     4613  </list>
     4614</t>
     4615<t>
     4616  <iref item="cacheable"/>
     4617  <x:dfn>cacheable</x:dfn>
     4618  <list>
     4619    <t>
     4620      A response is cacheable if a cache is allowed to store a copy of
     4621      the response message for use in answering subsequent requests. The
     4622      rules for determining the cacheability of HTTP responses are
     4623      defined in &caching;. Even if a resource is cacheable, there may
     4624      be additional constraints on whether a cache can use the cached
     4625      copy for a particular request.
     4626    </t>
     4627  </list>
     4628</t>
     4629<t>
     4630  <iref item="upstream"/>
     4631  <iref item="downstream"/>
     4632  <x:dfn>upstream</x:dfn>/<x:dfn>downstream</x:dfn>
     4633  <list>
     4634    <t>
     4635      Upstream and downstream describe the flow of a message: all
     4636      messages flow from upstream to downstream.
     4637    </t>
     4638  </list>
     4639</t>
     4640<t>
     4641  <iref item="inbound"/>
     4642  <iref item="outbound"/>
     4643  <x:dfn>inbound</x:dfn>/<x:dfn>outbound</x:dfn>
     4644  <list>
     4645    <t>
     4646      Inbound and outbound refer to the request and response paths for
     4647      messages: "inbound" means "traveling toward the origin server",
     4648      and "outbound" means "traveling toward the user agent"
     4649    </t>
     4650  </list>
     4651</t>
     4652</section>
     4653
    46544654</back>
    46554655</rfc>
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