Ignore:
Timestamp:
28/01/14 08:10:07 (6 years ago)
Author:
fielding@…
Message:

(editorial) rephrase how authoritative responses and authority works by name delegation; see #531

Location:
draft-ietf-httpbis/latest
Files:
2 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • draft-ietf-httpbis/latest/p1-messaging.html

    r2596 r2597  
    448448  }
    449449  @bottom-center {
    450        content: "Expires July 31, 2014";
     450       content: "Expires August 1, 2014";
    451451  }
    452452  @bottom-right {
     
    490490      <meta name="dct.creator" content="Reschke, J. F.">
    491491      <meta name="dct.identifier" content="urn:ietf:id:draft-ietf-httpbis-p1-messaging-latest">
    492       <meta name="dct.issued" scheme="ISO8601" content="2014-01-27">
     492      <meta name="dct.issued" scheme="ISO8601" content="2014-01-28">
    493493      <meta name="dct.replaces" content="urn:ietf:rfc:2145">
    494494      <meta name="dct.replaces" content="urn:ietf:rfc:2616">
     
    519519            <tr>
    520520               <td class="left">Intended status: Standards Track</td>
    521                <td class="right">January 27, 2014</td>
     521               <td class="right">January 28, 2014</td>
    522522            </tr>
    523523            <tr>
    524                <td class="left">Expires: July 31, 2014</td>
     524               <td class="left">Expires: August 1, 2014</td>
    525525               <td class="right"></td>
    526526            </tr>
     
    551551            in progress”.
    552552         </p>
    553          <p>This Internet-Draft will expire on July 31, 2014.</p>
     553         <p>This Internet-Draft will expire on August 1, 2014.</p>
    554554      </div>
    555555      <div id="rfc.copyrightnotice">
     
    11001100               <div id="rfc.figure.u.8"></div><pre class="inline"><span id="rfc.iref.g.27"></span>  <a href="#http.uri" class="smpl">http-URI</a> = "http:" "//" <a href="#uri" class="smpl">authority</a> <a href="#uri" class="smpl">path-abempty</a> [ "?" <a href="#uri" class="smpl">query</a> ]
    11011101             [ "#" <a href="#uri" class="smpl">fragment</a> ]
    1102 </pre><p id="rfc.section.2.7.1.p.3">The HTTP origin server is identified by the generic syntax's <a href="#uri" class="smpl">authority</a> component, which includes a host identifier and optional TCP port (<a href="#RFC3986" id="rfc.xref.RFC3986.14"><cite title="Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax">[RFC3986]</cite></a>, <a href="http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986#section-3.2.2">Section 3.2.2</a>). The hierarchical path component and optional query component serve as an identifier for a potential target resource within
     1102</pre><p id="rfc.section.2.7.1.p.3">The origin server for an "http" URI is identified by the <a href="#uri" class="smpl">authority</a> component, which includes a host identifier and optional TCP port (<a href="#RFC3986" id="rfc.xref.RFC3986.14"><cite title="Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax">[RFC3986]</cite></a>, <a href="http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986#section-3.2.2">Section 3.2.2</a>). The hierarchical path component and optional query component serve as an identifier for a potential target resource within
    11031103                  that origin server's name space. The optional fragment component allows for indirect identification of a secondary resource,
    11041104                  independent of the URI scheme, as defined in <a href="http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986#section-3.5">Section 3.5</a> of <a href="#RFC3986" id="rfc.xref.RFC3986.15"><cite title="Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax">[RFC3986]</cite></a>.
     
    11061106               <p id="rfc.section.2.7.1.p.4">A sender <em class="bcp14">MUST NOT</em> generate an "http" URI with an empty host identifier. A recipient that processes such a URI reference <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> reject it as invalid.
    11071107               </p>
    1108                <p id="rfc.section.2.7.1.p.5">If the host identifier is provided as an IP address, then the origin server is any listener on the indicated TCP port at that
    1109                   IP address. If host is a registered name, then that name is considered an indirect identifier and the recipient might use
    1110                   a name resolution service, such as DNS, to find the address of a listener for that host. If the port subcomponent is empty
    1111                   or not given, then TCP port 80 is assumed (the default reserved port for WWW services).
    1112                </p>
    1113                <p id="rfc.section.2.7.1.p.6">Regardless of the form of host identifier, access to that host is not implied by the mere presence of its name or address.
    1114                   The host might or might not exist and, even when it does exist, might or might not be running an HTTP server or listening
    1115                   to the indicated port. The "http" URI scheme makes use of the delegated nature of Internet names and addresses to establish
    1116                   a naming authority (whatever entity has the ability to place an HTTP server at that Internet name or address) and allows that
    1117                   authority to determine which names are valid and how they might be used.
     1108               <p id="rfc.section.2.7.1.p.5">If the host identifier is provided as an IP address, the origin server is the listener (if any) on the indicated TCP port
     1109                  at that IP address. If host is a registered name, the registered name is an indirect identifier for use with a name resolution
     1110                  service, such as DNS, to find an address for that origin server. If the port subcomponent is empty or not given, TCP port
     1111                  80 (the reserved port for WWW services) is the default.
     1112               </p>
     1113               <p id="rfc.section.2.7.1.p.6">Note that the presence of a URI with a given authority component does not imply that there is always an HTTP server listening
     1114                  for connections on that host and port. Anyone can mint a URI. What the authority component determines is who has the right
     1115                  to respond authoritatively to requests that target the identified resource. The delegated nature of registered names and IP
     1116                  addresses creates a federated namespace, based on control over the indicated host and port, whether or not an HTTP server
     1117                  is present.
    11181118               </p>
    11191119               <p id="rfc.section.2.7.1.p.7">When an "http" URI is used within a context that calls for access to the indicated resource, a client <em class="bcp14">MAY</em> attempt access by resolving the host to an IP address, establishing a TCP connection to that address on the indicated port,
  • draft-ietf-httpbis/latest/p1-messaging.xml

    r2596 r2597  
    870870</artwork></figure>
    871871<t>
    872    The HTTP origin server is identified by the generic syntax's
     872   The origin server for an "http" URI is identified by the
    873873   <x:ref>authority</x:ref> component, which includes a host identifier
    874874   and optional TCP port (<xref target="RFC3986" x:fmt="," x:sec="3.2.2"/>).
     
    884884</t>
    885885<t>
    886    If the host identifier is provided as an IP address,
    887    then the origin server is any listener on the indicated TCP port at
    888    that IP address. If host is a registered name, then that name is
    889    considered an indirect identifier and the recipient might use a name
    890    resolution service, such as DNS, to find the address of a listener
    891    for that host.
    892    If the port subcomponent is empty or not given, then TCP port 80 is
    893    assumed (the default reserved port for WWW services).
    894 </t>
    895 <t>
    896    Regardless of the form of host identifier, access to that host is not
    897    implied by the mere presence of its name or address. The host might or might
    898    not exist and, even when it does exist, might or might not be running an
    899    HTTP server or listening to the indicated port. The "http" URI scheme
    900    makes use of the delegated nature of Internet names and addresses to
    901    establish a naming authority (whatever entity has the ability to place
    902    an HTTP server at that Internet name or address) and allows that
    903    authority to determine which names are valid and how they might be used.
     886   If the host identifier is provided as an IP address, the origin server is
     887   the listener (if any) on the indicated TCP port at that IP address.
     888   If host is a registered name, the registered name is an indirect identifier
     889   for use with a name resolution service, such as DNS, to find an address for
     890   that origin server.
     891   If the port subcomponent is empty or not given, TCP port 80 (the
     892   reserved port for WWW services) is the default.
     893</t>
     894<t>
     895   Note that the presence of a URI with a given authority component does not
     896   imply that there is always an HTTP server listening for connections on
     897   that host and port. Anyone can mint a URI. What the authority component
     898   determines is who has the right to respond authoritatively to requests that
     899   target the identified resource. The delegated nature of registered names
     900   and IP addresses creates a federated namespace, based on control over the
     901   indicated host and port, whether or not an HTTP server is present.
    904902</t>
    905903<t>
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