Ignore:
Timestamp:
01/09/12 05:32:48 (8 years ago)
Author:
fielding@…
Message:

(editorial) wordsmithing and sectioning

File:
1 edited

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  • draft-ietf-httpbis/latest/p2-semantics.xml

    r1840 r1842  
    289289
    290290<section title="Request Methods" anchor="methods">
     291
     292<section title="Overview" anchor="method.overview">
    291293  <x:anchor-alias value="method"/>
    292294<t>
     
    322324   standardized methods are defined in all-uppercase ASCII letters.
    323325</t>
    324 <texttable align="left" suppress-title="true" anchor="method.overview">
     326<texttable align="left" suppress-title="true" anchor="table.of.methods">
    325327   <ttcol>Method</ttcol>
    326328   <ttcol>Description</ttcol>
     
    375377   with the <x:ref>405 (Method Not Allowed)</x:ref> status code.
    376378</t>
     379</section>
     380
    377381<section title="Common Method Properties" anchor="method.properties">
    378382
     
    451455   able to read the server's response.  For example, if a client sends a PUT
    452456   request and the underlying connection is closed before any response is
    453    received, then it can establish a new connection and retry the request
    454    because it knows that repeating the request will have the same effect
    455    even if the original request succeeded.  Note, however, that repeated
    456    failures would indicate a problem within the server.
     457   received, then it can establish a new connection and retry the idempotent
     458   request because it knows that repeating the request will have the same
     459   effect even if the original request succeeded.  Note, however, that
     460   repeated failures would indicate a problem within the server.
    457461</t>
    458462</section>
     
    466470   request.  GET and HEAD are defined to be cacheable.  In general, safe
    467471   methods that do not depend on a current or authoritative response are
    468    also cacheable, though the overwhelming majority of caches only support
     472   cacheable, though the overwhelming majority of caches only support
    469473   GET and HEAD. HTTP requirements for cache behavior and cacheable responses
    470474   are defined in &caching;.
     
    17841788    that it does not allow rewriting the request method from POST to GET. This
    17851789    specification defines no equivalent counterpart for <x:ref>301 (Moved
    1786     Permanently)</x:ref> (<xref target="draft-reschke-http-status-308"/>,
     1790    Permanently)</x:ref> (<xref target="status-308"/>,
    17871791    however, defines the status code 308 (Permanent Redirect) for this purpose).
    17881792  </t>
     
    50255029<references title="Informative References">
    50265030
    5027 <reference anchor="REST" target="http://www.ics.uci.edu/~fielding/pubs/dissertation/top.htm">
     5031<reference anchor="REST" target="http://roy.gbiv.com/pubs/dissertation/top.htm">
    50285032  <front>
    50295033    <title>Architectural Styles and the Design of Network-based Software Architectures</title>
    50305034    <author initials="R.T." surname="Fielding" fullname="Roy T. Fielding">
    5031       <organization>Doctoral Dissertation, University of California, Irvine</organization>
    5032     </author>
    5033     <date month="Sep" year="2000"/>
     5035    </author>
     5036    <date month="September" year="2000"/>
    50345037  </front>
     5038  <seriesInfo name='Doctoral Dissertation, University of California, Irvine' value=''/>
    50355039</reference>
    50365040
     
    53835387</reference>
    53845388
    5385 <reference anchor="draft-reschke-http-status-308">
     5389<reference anchor="status-308">
    53865390        <front>
    53875391    <title abbrev="HTTP Status Code 308">The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) Status Code 308 (Permanent Redirect)</title>
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