Ignore:
Timestamp:
Jul 15, 2012, 1:24:07 AM (7 years ago)
Author:
fielding@…
Message:

Update p1 abstract and introduction; add document series map

File:
1 edited

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  • draft-ietf-httpbis/latest/p1-messaging.xml

    r1780 r1785  
    128128   The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is an application-level protocol for
    129129   distributed, collaborative, hypertext information systems. HTTP has been in
    130    use by the World Wide Web global information initiative since 1990. This
    131    document is Part 1 of the seven-part specification that defines the protocol
    132    referred to as "HTTP/1.1" and, taken together, obsoletes
    133    <xref target="RFC2616" x:fmt="none">RFC 2616</xref> and moves it to historic
    134    status, along with its predecessor <xref target="RFC2068" x:fmt="none">RFC
    135    2068</xref>.
    136 </t>
    137 <t>
    138    Part 1 provides an overview of HTTP and its associated terminology, defines
    139    the "http" and "https" Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) schemes, defines
    140    the generic message syntax and parsing requirements for HTTP message frames,
     130   use by the World Wide Web global information initiative since 1990.
     131   This document provides an overview of HTTP architecture and its associated
     132   terminology, defines the "http" and "https" Uniform Resource Identifier
     133   (URI) schemes, defines the HTTP/1.1 message syntax and parsing requirements,
    141134   and describes general security concerns for implementations.
    142 </t>
    143 <t>
    144    This part also obsoletes RFCs <xref target="RFC2145" x:fmt="none">2145</xref>
    145    (on HTTP version numbers) and <xref target="RFC2817" x:fmt="none">2817</xref>
    146    (on using CONNECT for TLS upgrades) and moves them to historic status.
    147 </t>
     135</t>   
    148136</abstract>
    149137
     
    171159   request/response protocol that uses extensible semantics and MIME-like
    172160   message payloads for flexible interaction with network-based hypertext
    173    information systems. HTTP relies upon the Uniform Resource Identifier (URI)
    174    standard <xref target="RFC3986"/> to indicate the target resource
    175    (<xref target="target-resource"/>) and relationships between resources.
    176    Messages are passed in a format similar to that used by Internet mail
    177    <xref target="RFC5322"/> and the Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
    178    (MIME) <xref target="RFC2045"/> (see &diff-mime; for the differences
    179    between HTTP and MIME messages).
     161   information systems. This document is the first in a series of documents
     162   that collectively form the HTTP/1.1 specification:
     163   <list style="empty">
     164    <t>RFC xxx1: URIs, Connections, and Message Parsing</t>
     165    <t><xref target="Part2" x:fmt="none">RFC xxx2</xref>: Core Semantics</t>
     166    <t><xref target="Part4" x:fmt="none">RFC xxx4</xref>: Conditional Requests</t>
     167    <t><xref target="Part5" x:fmt="none">RFC xxx5</xref>: Range Requests</t>
     168    <t><xref target="Part6" x:fmt="none">RFC xxx6</xref>: Caching</t>
     169    <t><xref target="Part7" x:fmt="none">RFC xxx7</xref>: Authentication</t>
     170   </list>
     171</t>
     172<t>
     173   This HTTP/1,1 specification obsoletes and moves to historic status
     174   <xref target="RFC2616" x:fmt="none">RFC 2616</xref>, its predecessor
     175   <xref target="RFC2068" x:fmt="none">RFC 2068</xref>,
     176   <xref target="RFC2145" x:fmt="none">RFC 2145</xref> (on HTTP versioning),
     177   and <xref target="RFC2817" x:fmt="none">RFC 2817</xref> (on using CONNECT
     178   for TLS upgrades).
    180179</t>
    181180<t>
     
    211210</t>
    212211<t>
    213    This document is Part 1 of the seven-part specification of HTTP,
    214    defining the protocol referred to as "HTTP/1.1", obsoleting
    215    <xref target="RFC2616"/> and <xref target="RFC2145"/>.
    216    Part 1 describes the architectural elements that are used or
     212   This document describes the architectural elements that are used or
    217213   referred to in HTTP, defines the "http" and "https" URI schemes,
    218214   describes overall network operation and connection management,
     
    223219   message-forwarding intermediaries.
    224220</t>
     221
    225222
    226223<section title="Requirement Notation" anchor="intro.requirements">
     
    320317</t>
    321318<t>
     319   HTTP relies upon the Uniform Resource Identifier (URI)
     320   standard <xref target="RFC3986"/> to indicate the target resource
     321   (<xref target="target-resource"/>) and relationships between resources.
     322   Messages are passed in a format similar to that used by Internet mail
     323   <xref target="RFC5322"/> and the Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
     324   (MIME) <xref target="RFC2045"/> (see &diff-mime; for the differences
     325   between HTTP and MIME messages).
     326</t>
     327<t>
    322328   Most HTTP communication consists of a retrieval request (GET) for
    323329   a representation of some resource identified by a URI.  In the
     
    337343   message, beginning with a request-line that includes a method, URI, and
    338344   protocol version (<xref target="request.line"/>),
    339    followed by MIME-like header fields containing
     345   followed by header fields containing
    340346   request modifiers, client information, and representation metadata
    341347   (<xref target="header.fields"/>),
     
    350356   includes the protocol version, a success or error code, and textual
    351357   reason phrase (<xref target="status.line"/>),
    352    possibly followed by MIME-like header fields containing server
     358   possibly followed by header fields containing server
    353359   information, resource metadata, and representation metadata
    354360   (<xref target="header.fields"/>),
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