Changeset 1785


Ignore:
Timestamp:
Jul 15, 2012, 1:24:07 AM (7 years ago)
Author:
fielding@…
Message:

Update p1 abstract and introduction; add document series map

Location:
draft-ietf-httpbis/latest
Files:
2 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • draft-ietf-httpbis/latest/p1-messaging.html

    r1780 r1785  
    449449  }
    450450  @bottom-center {
    451        content: "Expires January 15, 2013";
     451       content: "Expires January 16, 2013";
    452452  }
    453453  @bottom-right {
     
    491491      <meta name="dct.creator" content="Reschke, J. F.">
    492492      <meta name="dct.identifier" content="urn:ietf:id:draft-ietf-httpbis-p1-messaging-latest">
    493       <meta name="dct.issued" scheme="ISO8601" content="2012-07-14">
     493      <meta name="dct.issued" scheme="ISO8601" content="2012-07-15">
    494494      <meta name="dct.replaces" content="urn:ietf:rfc:2145">
    495495      <meta name="dct.replaces" content="urn:ietf:rfc:2616">
    496       <meta name="dct.abstract" content="The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is an application-level protocol for distributed, collaborative, hypertext information systems. HTTP has been in use by the World Wide Web global information initiative since 1990. This document is Part 1 of the seven-part specification that defines the protocol referred to as &#34;HTTP/1.1&#34; and, taken together, obsoletes RFC 2616 and moves it to historic status, along with its predecessor RFC 2068. Part 1 provides an overview of HTTP and its associated terminology, defines the &#34;http&#34; and &#34;https&#34; Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) schemes, defines the generic message syntax and parsing requirements for HTTP message frames, and describes general security concerns for implementations. This part also obsoletes RFCs 2145 (on HTTP version numbers) and 2817 (on using CONNECT for TLS upgrades) and moves them to historic status.">
    497       <meta name="description" content="The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is an application-level protocol for distributed, collaborative, hypertext information systems. HTTP has been in use by the World Wide Web global information initiative since 1990. This document is Part 1 of the seven-part specification that defines the protocol referred to as &#34;HTTP/1.1&#34; and, taken together, obsoletes RFC 2616 and moves it to historic status, along with its predecessor RFC 2068. Part 1 provides an overview of HTTP and its associated terminology, defines the &#34;http&#34; and &#34;https&#34; Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) schemes, defines the generic message syntax and parsing requirements for HTTP message frames, and describes general security concerns for implementations. This part also obsoletes RFCs 2145 (on HTTP version numbers) and 2817 (on using CONNECT for TLS upgrades) and moves them to historic status.">
     496      <meta name="dct.abstract" content="The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is an application-level protocol for distributed, collaborative, hypertext information systems. HTTP has been in use by the World Wide Web global information initiative since 1990. This document provides an overview of HTTP architecture and its associated terminology, defines the &#34;http&#34; and &#34;https&#34; Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) schemes, defines the HTTP/1.1 message syntax and parsing requirements, and describes general security concerns for implementations.">
     497      <meta name="description" content="The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is an application-level protocol for distributed, collaborative, hypertext information systems. HTTP has been in use by the World Wide Web global information initiative since 1990. This document provides an overview of HTTP architecture and its associated terminology, defines the &#34;http&#34; and &#34;https&#34; Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) schemes, defines the HTTP/1.1 message syntax and parsing requirements, and describes general security concerns for implementations.">
    498498   </head>
    499499   <body onload="init();">
     
    523523            </tr>
    524524            <tr>
    525                <td class="left">Expires: January 15, 2013</td>
     525               <td class="left">Expires: January 16, 2013</td>
    526526               <td class="right">greenbytes</td>
    527527            </tr>
    528528            <tr>
    529529               <td class="left"></td>
    530                <td class="right">July 14, 2012</td>
     530               <td class="right">July 15, 2012</td>
    531531            </tr>
    532532         </tbody>
     
    535535      <h1 id="rfc.abstract"><a href="#rfc.abstract">Abstract</a></h1>
    536536      <p>The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is an application-level protocol for distributed, collaborative, hypertext information
    537          systems. HTTP has been in use by the World Wide Web global information initiative since 1990. This document is Part 1 of the
    538          seven-part specification that defines the protocol referred to as "HTTP/1.1" and, taken together, obsoletes <cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.1">RFC 2616</cite> and moves it to historic status, along with its predecessor <cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1" id="rfc.xref.RFC2068.1">RFC 2068</cite>.
    539       </p> 
    540       <p>Part 1 provides an overview of HTTP and its associated terminology, defines the "http" and "https" Uniform Resource Identifier
    541          (URI) schemes, defines the generic message syntax and parsing requirements for HTTP message frames, and describes general
    542          security concerns for implementations.
    543       </p> 
    544       <p>This part also obsoletes RFCs <cite title="Use and Interpretation of HTTP Version Numbers" id="rfc.xref.RFC2145.1">2145</cite> (on HTTP version numbers) and <cite title="Upgrading to TLS Within HTTP/1.1" id="rfc.xref.RFC2817.1">2817</cite> (on using CONNECT for TLS upgrades) and moves them to historic status.
     537         systems. HTTP has been in use by the World Wide Web global information initiative since 1990. This document provides an overview
     538         of HTTP architecture and its associated terminology, defines the "http" and "https" Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) schemes,
     539         defines the HTTP/1.1 message syntax and parsing requirements, and describes general security concerns for implementations.
    545540      </p>
    546541      <h1 id="rfc.note.1"><a href="#rfc.note.1">Editorial Note (To be removed by RFC Editor)</a></h1>
     
    560555         in progress”.
    561556      </p>
    562       <p>This Internet-Draft will expire on January 15, 2013.</p>
     557      <p>This Internet-Draft will expire on January 16, 2013.</p>
    563558      <h1><a id="rfc.copyrightnotice" href="#rfc.copyrightnotice">Copyright Notice</a></h1>
    564559      <p>Copyright © 2012 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the document authors. All rights reserved.</p>
     
    745740      <h1 id="rfc.section.1" class="np"><a href="#rfc.section.1">1.</a>&nbsp;<a id="introduction" href="#introduction">Introduction</a></h1>
    746741      <p id="rfc.section.1.p.1">The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is an application-level request/response protocol that uses extensible semantics and
    747          MIME-like message payloads for flexible interaction with network-based hypertext information systems. HTTP relies upon the
    748          Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) standard <a href="#RFC3986" id="rfc.xref.RFC3986.1"><cite title="Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax">[RFC3986]</cite></a> to indicate the target resource (<a href="#target-resource" title="Identifying a Target Resource">Section&nbsp;5.1</a>) and relationships between resources. Messages are passed in a format similar to that used by Internet mail <a href="#RFC5322" id="rfc.xref.RFC5322.1"><cite title="Internet Message Format">[RFC5322]</cite></a> and the Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) <a href="#RFC2045" id="rfc.xref.RFC2045.1"><cite title="Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) Part One: Format of Internet Message Bodies">[RFC2045]</cite></a> (see <a href="p2-semantics.html#differences.between.http.and.mime" title="Differences between HTTP and MIME">Appendix A</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.1"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a> for the differences between HTTP and MIME messages).
    749       </p>
    750       <p id="rfc.section.1.p.2">HTTP is a generic interface protocol for information systems. It is designed to hide the details of how a service is implemented
     742         MIME-like message payloads for flexible interaction with network-based hypertext information systems. This document is the
     743         first in a series of documents that collectively form the HTTP/1.1 specification:
     744      </p>
     745      <ul class="empty">
     746         <li>RFC xxx1: URIs, Connections, and Message Parsing</li>
     747         <li><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation" id="rfc.xref.Part2.1">RFC xxx2</cite>: Core Semantics
     748         </li>
     749         <li><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 4: Conditional Requests" id="rfc.xref.Part4.1">RFC xxx4</cite>: Conditional Requests
     750         </li>
     751         <li><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 5: Range Requests and Partial Responses" id="rfc.xref.Part5.1">RFC xxx5</cite>: Range Requests
     752         </li>
     753         <li><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 6: Caching" id="rfc.xref.Part6.1">RFC xxx6</cite>: Caching
     754         </li>
     755         <li><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 7: Authentication" id="rfc.xref.Part7.1">RFC xxx7</cite>: Authentication
     756         </li>
     757      </ul>
     758      <p id="rfc.section.1.p.2">This HTTP/1,1 specification obsoletes and moves to historic status <cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.1">RFC 2616</cite>, its predecessor <cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1" id="rfc.xref.RFC2068.1">RFC 2068</cite>, <cite title="Use and Interpretation of HTTP Version Numbers" id="rfc.xref.RFC2145.1">RFC 2145</cite> (on HTTP versioning), and <cite title="Upgrading to TLS Within HTTP/1.1" id="rfc.xref.RFC2817.1">2817</cite> (on using CONNECT for TLS upgrades).
     759      </p>
     760      <p id="rfc.section.1.p.3">HTTP is a generic interface protocol for information systems. It is designed to hide the details of how a service is implemented
    751761         by presenting a uniform interface to clients that is independent of the types of resources provided. Likewise, servers do
    752762         not need to be aware of each client's purpose: an HTTP request can be considered in isolation rather than being associated
     
    754764         effectively in many different contexts and for which implementations can evolve independently over time.
    755765      </p>
    756       <p id="rfc.section.1.p.3">HTTP is also designed for use as an intermediation protocol for translating communication to and from non-HTTP information
     766      <p id="rfc.section.1.p.4">HTTP is also designed for use as an intermediation protocol for translating communication to and from non-HTTP information
    757767         systems. HTTP proxies and gateways can provide access to alternative information services by translating their diverse protocols
    758768         into a hypertext format that can be viewed and manipulated by clients in the same way as HTTP services.
    759769      </p>
    760       <p id="rfc.section.1.p.4">One consequence of HTTP flexibility is that the protocol cannot be defined in terms of what occurs behind the interface. Instead,
     770      <p id="rfc.section.1.p.5">One consequence of HTTP flexibility is that the protocol cannot be defined in terms of what occurs behind the interface. Instead,
    761771         we are limited to defining the syntax of communication, the intent of received communication, and the expected behavior of
    762772         recipients. If the communication is considered in isolation, then successful actions ought to be reflected in corresponding
     
    764774         at cross-purposes, we cannot require that such changes be observable beyond the scope of a single response.
    765775      </p>
    766       <p id="rfc.section.1.p.5">This document is Part 1 of the seven-part specification of HTTP, defining the protocol referred to as "HTTP/1.1", obsoleting <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.2"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2616]</cite></a> and <a href="#RFC2145" id="rfc.xref.RFC2145.2"><cite title="Use and Interpretation of HTTP Version Numbers">[RFC2145]</cite></a>. Part 1 describes the architectural elements that are used or referred to in HTTP, defines the "http" and "https" URI schemes,
    767          describes overall network operation and connection management, and defines HTTP message framing and forwarding requirements.
     776      <p id="rfc.section.1.p.6">This document describes the architectural elements that are used or referred to in HTTP, defines the "http" and "https" URI
     777         schemes, describes overall network operation and connection management, and defines HTTP message framing and forwarding requirements.
    768778         Our goal is to define all of the mechanisms necessary for HTTP message handling that are independent of message semantics,
    769779         thereby defining the complete set of requirements for message parsers and message-forwarding intermediaries.
     
    816826         "<dfn>sender</dfn>" to refer to whichever component sent a given message and the term "<dfn>recipient</dfn>" to refer to any component that receives the message.
    817827      </p>
    818       <p id="rfc.section.2.1.p.3">Most HTTP communication consists of a retrieval request (GET) for a representation of some resource identified by a URI. In
     828      <p id="rfc.section.2.1.p.3">HTTP relies upon the Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) standard <a href="#RFC3986" id="rfc.xref.RFC3986.1"><cite title="Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax">[RFC3986]</cite></a> to indicate the target resource (<a href="#target-resource" title="Identifying a Target Resource">Section&nbsp;5.1</a>) and relationships between resources. Messages are passed in a format similar to that used by Internet mail <a href="#RFC5322" id="rfc.xref.RFC5322.1"><cite title="Internet Message Format">[RFC5322]</cite></a> and the Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) <a href="#RFC2045" id="rfc.xref.RFC2045.1"><cite title="Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) Part One: Format of Internet Message Bodies">[RFC2045]</cite></a> (see <a href="p2-semantics.html#differences.between.http.and.mime" title="Differences between HTTP and MIME">Appendix A</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.2"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a> for the differences between HTTP and MIME messages).
     829      </p>
     830      <p id="rfc.section.2.1.p.4">Most HTTP communication consists of a retrieval request (GET) for a representation of some resource identified by a URI. In
    819831         the simplest case, this might be accomplished via a single bidirectional connection (===) between the user agent (UA) and
    820832         the origin server (O).
     
    826838      <div id="rfc.iref.r.2"></div>
    827839      <div id="rfc.iref.r.3"></div>
    828       <p id="rfc.section.2.1.p.5">A client sends an HTTP request to a server in the form of a <dfn>request</dfn> message, beginning with a request-line that includes a method, URI, and protocol version (<a href="#request.line" title="Request Line">Section&nbsp;3.1.1</a>), followed by MIME-like header fields containing request modifiers, client information, and representation metadata (<a href="#header.fields" title="Header Fields">Section&nbsp;3.2</a>), an empty line to indicate the end of the header section, and finally a message body containing the payload body (if any, <a href="#message.body" title="Message Body">Section&nbsp;3.3</a>).
    829       </p>
    830       <p id="rfc.section.2.1.p.6">A server responds to a client's request by sending one or more HTTP <dfn>response</dfn> messages, each beginning with a status line that includes the protocol version, a success or error code, and textual reason
    831          phrase (<a href="#status.line" title="Status Line">Section&nbsp;3.1.2</a>), possibly followed by MIME-like header fields containing server information, resource metadata, and representation metadata
    832          (<a href="#header.fields" title="Header Fields">Section&nbsp;3.2</a>), an empty line to indicate the end of the header section, and finally a message body containing the payload body (if any, <a href="#message.body" title="Message Body">Section&nbsp;3.3</a>).
    833       </p>
    834       <p id="rfc.section.2.1.p.7">The following example illustrates a typical message exchange for a GET request on the URI "http://www.example.com/hello.txt":</p>
     840      <p id="rfc.section.2.1.p.6">A client sends an HTTP request to a server in the form of a <dfn>request</dfn> message, beginning with a request-line that includes a method, URI, and protocol version (<a href="#request.line" title="Request Line">Section&nbsp;3.1.1</a>), followed by header fields containing request modifiers, client information, and representation metadata (<a href="#header.fields" title="Header Fields">Section&nbsp;3.2</a>), an empty line to indicate the end of the header section, and finally a message body containing the payload body (if any, <a href="#message.body" title="Message Body">Section&nbsp;3.3</a>).
     841      </p>
     842      <p id="rfc.section.2.1.p.7">A server responds to a client's request by sending one or more HTTP <dfn>response</dfn> messages, each beginning with a status line that includes the protocol version, a success or error code, and textual reason
     843         phrase (<a href="#status.line" title="Status Line">Section&nbsp;3.1.2</a>), possibly followed by header fields containing server information, resource metadata, and representation metadata (<a href="#header.fields" title="Header Fields">Section&nbsp;3.2</a>), an empty line to indicate the end of the header section, and finally a message body containing the payload body (if any, <a href="#message.body" title="Message Body">Section&nbsp;3.3</a>).
     844      </p>
     845      <p id="rfc.section.2.1.p.8">The following example illustrates a typical message exchange for a GET request on the URI "http://www.example.com/hello.txt":</p>
    835846      <div id="rfc.figure.u.2"></div>
    836847      <p>client request:</p><pre class="text2">GET /hello.txt HTTP/1.1
     
    911922         or an intranet-to-Internet privacy filter. Such transformations are presumed to be desired by the client (or client organization)
    912923         that selected the proxy and are beyond the scope of this specification. However, when a proxy is not intended to transform
    913          a given message, we use the term "<dfn>non-transforming proxy</dfn>" to target requirements that preserve HTTP message semantics. See <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.203" title="203 Non-Authoritative Information">Section 4.4.4</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.2"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a> and <a href="p6-cache.html#header.warning" title="Warning">Section 7.6</a> of <a href="#Part6" id="rfc.xref.Part6.1"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 6: Caching">[Part6]</cite></a> for status and warning codes related to transformations.
     924         a given message, we use the term "<dfn>non-transforming proxy</dfn>" to target requirements that preserve HTTP message semantics. See <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.203" title="203 Non-Authoritative Information">Section 4.4.4</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.3"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a> and <a href="p6-cache.html#header.warning" title="Warning">Section 7.6</a> of <a href="#Part6" id="rfc.xref.Part6.2"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 6: Caching">[Part6]</cite></a> for status and warning codes related to transformations.
    914925      </p>
    915926      <p id="rfc.section.2.4.p.7"><span id="rfc.iref.g.13"></span><span id="rfc.iref.r.4"></span>  <span id="rfc.iref.a.1"></span> A "<dfn>gateway</dfn>" (a.k.a., "<dfn>reverse proxy</dfn>") is a receiving agent that acts as a layer above some other server(s) and translates the received requests to the underlying
     
    955966</pre><p id="rfc.section.2.5.p.4"><span id="rfc.iref.c.5"></span> A response is "<dfn>cacheable</dfn>" if a cache is allowed to store a copy of the response message for use in answering subsequent requests. Even when a response
    956967         is cacheable, there might be additional constraints placed by the client or by the origin server on when that cached response
    957          can be used for a particular request. HTTP requirements for cache behavior and cacheable responses are defined in <a href="p6-cache.html#caching.overview" title="Overview of Cache Operation">Section 2</a> of <a href="#Part6" id="rfc.xref.Part6.2"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 6: Caching">[Part6]</cite></a>.
     968         can be used for a particular request. HTTP requirements for cache behavior and cacheable responses are defined in <a href="p6-cache.html#caching.overview" title="Overview of Cache Operation">Section 2</a> of <a href="#Part6" id="rfc.xref.Part6.3"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 6: Caching">[Part6]</cite></a>.
    958969      </p>
    959970      <p id="rfc.section.2.5.p.5">There are a wide variety of architectures and configurations of caches and proxies deployed across the World Wide Web and
     
    10321043         is introduced, and that the minor number will only be incremented when changes made to the protocol have the effect of adding
    10331044         to the message semantics or implying additional capabilities of the sender. However, the minor version was not incremented
    1034          for the changes introduced between <a href="#RFC2068" id="rfc.xref.RFC2068.2"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2068]</cite></a> and <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.3"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2616]</cite></a>, and this revision is specifically avoiding any such changes to the protocol.
     1045         for the changes introduced between <a href="#RFC2068" id="rfc.xref.RFC2068.2"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2068]</cite></a> and <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.2"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2616]</cite></a>, and this revision is specifically avoiding any such changes to the protocol.
    10351046      </p>
    10361047      <div id="rfc.iref.r.5"></div>
     
    10811092      </p>
    10821093      <p id="rfc.section.2.8.1.p.6">When an "http" URI is used within a context that calls for access to the indicated resource, a client <em class="bcp14">MAY</em> attempt access by resolving the host to an IP address, establishing a TCP connection to that address on the indicated port,
    1083          and sending an HTTP request message (<a href="#http.message" title="Message Format">Section&nbsp;3</a>) containing the URI's identifying data (<a href="#message.routing" title="Message Routing">Section&nbsp;5</a>) to the server. If the server responds to that request with a non-interim HTTP response message, as described in <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.codes" title="Status Codes">Section 4</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.3"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>, then that response is considered an authoritative answer to the client's request.
     1094         and sending an HTTP request message (<a href="#http.message" title="Message Format">Section&nbsp;3</a>) containing the URI's identifying data (<a href="#message.routing" title="Message Routing">Section&nbsp;5</a>) to the server. If the server responds to that request with a non-interim HTTP response message, as described in <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.codes" title="Status Codes">Section 4</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.4"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>, then that response is considered an authoritative answer to the client's request.
    10841095      </p>
    10851096      <p id="rfc.section.2.8.1.p.7">Although HTTP is independent of the transport protocol, the "http" scheme is specific to TCP-based services because the name
     
    11061117      <div id="rfc.figure.u.9"></div><pre class="inline"><span id="rfc.iref.g.24"></span>  <a href="#https.uri" class="smpl">https-URI</a> = "https:" "//" <a href="#uri" class="smpl">authority</a> <a href="#uri" class="smpl">path-abempty</a> [ "?" <a href="#uri" class="smpl">query</a> ]
    11071118</pre><p id="rfc.section.2.8.2.p.4">Unlike the "http" scheme, responses to "https" identified requests are never "public" and thus <em class="bcp14">MUST NOT</em> be reused for shared caching. They can, however, be reused in a private cache if the message is cacheable by default in HTTP
    1108          or specifically indicated as such by the Cache-Control header field (<a href="p6-cache.html#header.cache-control" title="Cache-Control">Section 7.2</a> of <a href="#Part6" id="rfc.xref.Part6.3"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 6: Caching">[Part6]</cite></a>).
     1119         or specifically indicated as such by the Cache-Control header field (<a href="p6-cache.html#header.cache-control" title="Cache-Control">Section 7.2</a> of <a href="#Part6" id="rfc.xref.Part6.4"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 6: Caching">[Part6]</cite></a>).
    11091120      </p>
    11101121      <p id="rfc.section.2.8.2.p.5">Resources made available via the "https" scheme have no shared identity with the "http" scheme even if their resource identifiers
     
    11791190      </div>
    11801191      <div id="rfc.figure.u.14"></div><pre class="inline"><span id="rfc.iref.g.28"></span>  <a href="#method" class="smpl">method</a>         = <a href="#rule.token.separators" class="smpl">token</a>
    1181 </pre><p id="rfc.section.3.1.1.p.6">The methods defined by this specification can be found in <a href="p2-semantics.html#methods" title="Methods">Section 2</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.4"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>, along with information regarding the HTTP method registry and considerations for defining new methods.
     1192</pre><p id="rfc.section.3.1.1.p.6">The methods defined by this specification can be found in <a href="p2-semantics.html#methods" title="Methods">Section 2</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.5"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>, along with information regarding the HTTP method registry and considerations for defining new methods.
    11821193      </p>
    11831194      <div id="rfc.iref.r.6"></div>
     
    11921203      </p>
    11931204      <p id="rfc.section.3.1.1.p.10">HTTP does not place a pre-defined limit on the length of a request-line. A server that receives a method longer than any that
    1194          it implements <em class="bcp14">SHOULD</em> respond with either a <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.405" class="smpl">405 (Method Not Allowed)</a>, if it is an origin server, or a <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.501" class="smpl">501 (Not Implemented)</a> status code. A server <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> be prepared to receive URIs of unbounded length and respond with the <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.414" class="smpl">414 (URI Too Long)</a> status code if the received request-target would be longer than the server wishes to handle (see <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.414" title="414 URI Too Long">Section 4.6.12</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.5"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>).
     1205         it implements <em class="bcp14">SHOULD</em> respond with either a <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.405" class="smpl">405 (Method Not Allowed)</a>, if it is an origin server, or a <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.501" class="smpl">501 (Not Implemented)</a> status code. A server <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> be prepared to receive URIs of unbounded length and respond with the <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.414" class="smpl">414 (URI Too Long)</a> status code if the received request-target would be longer than the server wishes to handle (see <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.414" title="414 URI Too Long">Section 4.6.12</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.6"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>).
    11951206      </p>
    11961207      <p id="rfc.section.3.1.1.p.11">Various ad-hoc limitations on request-line length are found in practice. It is <em class="bcp14">RECOMMENDED</em> that all HTTP senders and recipients support, at a minimum, request-line lengths of up to 8000 octets.
     
    12051216      <p id="rfc.section.3.1.2.p.4">The status-code element is a 3-digit integer code describing the result of the server's attempt to understand and satisfy
    12061217         the client's corresponding request. The rest of the response message is to be interpreted in light of the semantics defined
    1207          for that status code. See <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.codes" title="Status Codes">Section 4</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.6"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a> for information about the semantics of status codes, including the classes of status code (indicated by the first digit),
     1218         for that status code. See <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.codes" title="Status Codes">Section 4</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.7"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a> for information about the semantics of status codes, including the classes of status code (indicated by the first digit),
    12081219         the status codes defined by this specification, considerations for the definition of new status codes, and the IANA registry.
    12091220      </p>
     
    12261237                 ; see <a href="#field.parsing" title="Field Parsing">Section&nbsp;3.2.2</a>
    12271238</pre><p id="rfc.section.3.2.p.3">The field-name token labels the corresponding field-value as having the semantics defined by that header field. For example,
    1228          the <a href="p2-semantics.html#header.date" class="smpl">Date</a> header field is defined in <a href="p2-semantics.html#header.date" title="Date">Section 9.10</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.7"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a> as containing the origination timestamp for the message in which it appears.
     1239         the <a href="p2-semantics.html#header.date" class="smpl">Date</a> header field is defined in <a href="p2-semantics.html#header.date" title="Date">Section 9.10</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.8"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a> as containing the origination timestamp for the message in which it appears.
    12291240      </p>
    12301241      <p id="rfc.section.3.2.p.4">HTTP header fields are fully extensible: there is no limit on the introduction of new field names, each presumably defining
     
    12341245         them.
    12351246      </p>
    1236       <p id="rfc.section.3.2.p.5">New HTTP header fields <em class="bcp14">SHOULD</em> be registered with IANA according to the procedures in <a href="p2-semantics.html#considerations.for.creating.header.fields" title="Considerations for Creating Header Fields">Section 3.1</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.8"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>. Unrecognized header fields <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> be forwarded by a proxy unless the field-name is listed in the <a href="#header.connection" class="smpl">Connection</a> header field (<a href="#header.connection" id="rfc.xref.header.connection.3" title="Connection">Section&nbsp;6.1</a>) or the proxy is specifically configured to block or otherwise transform such fields. Unrecognized header fields <em class="bcp14">SHOULD</em> be ignored by other recipients.
     1247      <p id="rfc.section.3.2.p.5">New HTTP header fields <em class="bcp14">SHOULD</em> be registered with IANA according to the procedures in <a href="p2-semantics.html#considerations.for.creating.header.fields" title="Considerations for Creating Header Fields">Section 3.1</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.9"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>. Unrecognized header fields <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> be forwarded by a proxy unless the field-name is listed in the <a href="#header.connection" class="smpl">Connection</a> header field (<a href="#header.connection" id="rfc.xref.header.connection.3" title="Connection">Section&nbsp;6.1</a>) or the proxy is specifically configured to block or otherwise transform such fields. Unrecognized header fields <em class="bcp14">SHOULD</em> be ignored by other recipients.
    12371248      </p>
    12381249      <p id="rfc.section.3.2.p.6">The order in which header fields with differing field names are received is not significant. However, it is "good practice"
     
    14171428      <p id="rfc.section.3.3.1.p.6">If more than one Transfer-Encoding header field is present in a message, the multiple field-values <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> be combined into one field-value, according to the algorithm defined in <a href="#header.fields" title="Header Fields">Section&nbsp;3.2</a>, before determining the message body length.
    14181429      </p>
    1419       <p id="rfc.section.3.3.1.p.7">Unlike <a href="p2-semantics.html#header.content-encoding" class="smpl">Content-Encoding</a> (<a href="p2-semantics.html#content.codings" title="Content Codings">Section 5.4</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.9"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>), Transfer-Encoding is a property of the message, not of the payload, and thus <em class="bcp14">MAY</em> be added or removed by any implementation along the request/response chain. Additional information about the encoding parameters <em class="bcp14">MAY</em> be provided by other header fields not defined by this specification.
    1420       </p>
    1421       <p id="rfc.section.3.3.1.p.8">Transfer-Encoding <em class="bcp14">MAY</em> be sent in a response to a HEAD request or in a <a href="p4-conditional.html#status.304" class="smpl">304 (Not Modified)</a> response (<a href="p4-conditional.html#status.304" title="304 Not Modified">Section 4.1</a> of <a href="#Part4" id="rfc.xref.Part4.1"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 4: Conditional Requests">[Part4]</cite></a>) to a GET request, neither of which includes a message body, to indicate that the origin server would have applied a transfer
     1430      <p id="rfc.section.3.3.1.p.7">Unlike <a href="p2-semantics.html#header.content-encoding" class="smpl">Content-Encoding</a> (<a href="p2-semantics.html#content.codings" title="Content Codings">Section 5.4</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.10"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>), Transfer-Encoding is a property of the message, not of the payload, and thus <em class="bcp14">MAY</em> be added or removed by any implementation along the request/response chain. Additional information about the encoding parameters <em class="bcp14">MAY</em> be provided by other header fields not defined by this specification.
     1431      </p>
     1432      <p id="rfc.section.3.3.1.p.8">Transfer-Encoding <em class="bcp14">MAY</em> be sent in a response to a HEAD request or in a <a href="p4-conditional.html#status.304" class="smpl">304 (Not Modified)</a> response (<a href="p4-conditional.html#status.304" title="304 Not Modified">Section 4.1</a> of <a href="#Part4" id="rfc.xref.Part4.2"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 4: Conditional Requests">[Part4]</cite></a>) to a GET request, neither of which includes a message body, to indicate that the origin server would have applied a transfer
    14221433         coding to the message body if the request had been an unconditional GET. This indication is not required, however, because
    14231434         any recipient on the response chain (including the origin server) can remove transfer codings when they are not needed.
     
    14391450      <div id="rfc.figure.u.36"></div><pre class="text">  Content-Length: 3495
    14401451</pre><p id="rfc.section.3.3.2.p.5">In the case of a response to a HEAD request, Content-Length indicates the size of the payload body (without any potential
    1441          transfer-coding) that would have been sent had the request been a GET. In the case of a <a href="p4-conditional.html#status.304" class="smpl">304 (Not Modified)</a> response (<a href="p4-conditional.html#status.304" title="304 Not Modified">Section 4.1</a> of <a href="#Part4" id="rfc.xref.Part4.2"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 4: Conditional Requests">[Part4]</cite></a>) to a GET request, Content-Length indicates the size of the payload body (without any potential transfer-coding) that would
     1452         transfer-coding) that would have been sent had the request been a GET. In the case of a <a href="p4-conditional.html#status.304" class="smpl">304 (Not Modified)</a> response (<a href="p4-conditional.html#status.304" title="304 Not Modified">Section 4.1</a> of <a href="#Part4" id="rfc.xref.Part4.3"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 4: Conditional Requests">[Part4]</cite></a>) to a GET request, Content-Length indicates the size of the payload body (without any potential transfer-coding) that would
    14421453         have been sent in a <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.200" class="smpl">200 (OK)</a> response.
    14431454      </p>
     
    15341545      </p>
    15351546      <p id="rfc.section.3.4.p.4">A user agent <em class="bcp14">MUST NOT</em> render an incomplete response message body as if it were complete (i.e., some indication needs to be given to the user that
    1536          an error occurred). Cache requirements for incomplete responses are defined in <a href="p6-cache.html#response.cacheability" title="Storing Responses in Caches">Section 3</a> of <a href="#Part6" id="rfc.xref.Part6.4"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 6: Caching">[Part6]</cite></a>.
     1547         an error occurred). Cache requirements for incomplete responses are defined in <a href="p6-cache.html#response.cacheability" title="Storing Responses in Caches">Section 3</a> of <a href="#Part6" id="rfc.xref.Part6.5"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 6: Caching">[Part6]</cite></a>.
    15371548      </p>
    15381549      <p id="rfc.section.3.4.p.5">A server <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> read the entire request message body or close the connection after sending its response, since otherwise the remaining data
     
    17181729      </p>
    17191730      <h3 id="rfc.section.4.3.1"><a href="#rfc.section.4.3.1">4.3.1</a>&nbsp;<a id="quality.values" href="#quality.values">Quality Values</a></h3>
    1720       <p id="rfc.section.4.3.1.p.1">Both transfer codings (<a href="#header.te" class="smpl">TE</a> request header field, <a href="#header.te" id="rfc.xref.header.te.3" title="TE">Section&nbsp;4.3</a>) and content negotiation (<a href="p2-semantics.html#content.negotiation" title="Content Negotiation">Section 8</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.10"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>) use short "floating point" numbers to indicate the relative importance ("weight") of various negotiable parameters. A weight
     1731      <p id="rfc.section.4.3.1.p.1">Both transfer codings (<a href="#header.te" class="smpl">TE</a> request header field, <a href="#header.te" id="rfc.xref.header.te.3" title="TE">Section&nbsp;4.3</a>) and content negotiation (<a href="p2-semantics.html#content.negotiation" title="Content Negotiation">Section 8</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.11"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>) use short "floating point" numbers to indicate the relative importance ("weight") of various negotiable parameters. A weight
    17211732         is normalized to a real number in the range 0 through 1, where 0 is the minimum and 1 the maximum value. If a parameter has
    17221733         a quality value of 0, then content with this parameter is "not acceptable" for the client. HTTP/1.1 applications <em class="bcp14">MUST NOT</em> generate more than three digits after the decimal point. User configuration of these values <em class="bcp14">SHOULD</em> also be limited in this fashion.
     
    17601771      </p>
    17611772      <p id="rfc.section.5.1.p.2">HTTP communication is initiated by a user agent for some purpose. The purpose is a combination of request semantics, which
    1762          are defined in <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.11"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>, and a target resource upon which to apply those semantics. A URI reference (<a href="#uri" title="Uniform Resource Identifiers">Section&nbsp;2.8</a>) is typically used as an identifier for the "target resource", which a user agent would resolve to its absolute form in order
     1773         are defined in <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.12"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>, and a target resource upon which to apply those semantics. A URI reference (<a href="#uri" title="Uniform Resource Identifiers">Section&nbsp;2.8</a>) is typically used as an identifier for the "target resource", which a user agent would resolve to its absolute form in order
    17631774         to obtain the "target URI". The target URI excludes the reference's fragment identifier component, if any, since fragment
    17641775         identifiers are reserved for client-side processing (<a href="#RFC3986" id="rfc.xref.RFC3986.18"><cite title="Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax">[RFC3986]</cite></a>, <a href="http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986#section-3.5">Section 3.5</a>).
     
    17691780         semantics and, if so, where that request is to be directed.
    17701781      </p>
    1771       <p id="rfc.section.5.2.p.2">If the client has a response cache and the request semantics can be satisfied by a cache (<a href="#Part6" id="rfc.xref.Part6.5"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 6: Caching">[Part6]</cite></a>), then the request is usually directed to the cache first.
     1782      <p id="rfc.section.5.2.p.2">If the client has a response cache and the request semantics can be satisfied by a cache (<a href="#Part6" id="rfc.xref.Part6.6"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 6: Caching">[Part6]</cite></a>), then the request is usually directed to the cache first.
    17721783      </p>
    17731784      <p id="rfc.section.5.2.p.3">If the request is not satisfied by a cache, then a typical client will check its configuration to determine whether a proxy
     
    18191830      </p>
    18201831      <div id="authority-form">
    1821          <p id="rfc.section.5.3.p.13"><span id="rfc.iref.a.3"></span> The authority-form of request-target is only used for CONNECT requests (<a href="p2-semantics.html#CONNECT" title="CONNECT">Section 2.3.8</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.12"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>). When making a CONNECT request to establish a tunnel through one or more proxies, a client <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> send only the target URI's authority component (excluding any userinfo) as the request-target. For example,
     1832         <p id="rfc.section.5.3.p.13"><span id="rfc.iref.a.3"></span> The authority-form of request-target is only used for CONNECT requests (<a href="p2-semantics.html#CONNECT" title="CONNECT">Section 2.3.8</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.13"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>). When making a CONNECT request to establish a tunnel through one or more proxies, a client <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> send only the target URI's authority component (excluding any userinfo) as the request-target. For example,
    18221833         </p>
    18231834      </div>
    18241835      <div id="rfc.figure.u.49"></div><pre class="text2">CONNECT www.example.com:80 HTTP/1.1
    18251836</pre><div id="asterisk-form">
    1826          <p id="rfc.section.5.3.p.15"><span id="rfc.iref.a.4"></span> The asterisk-form of request-target is only used for a server-wide OPTIONS request (<a href="p2-semantics.html#OPTIONS" title="OPTIONS">Section 2.3.1</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.13"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>). When a client wishes to request OPTIONS for the server as a whole, as opposed to a specific named resource of that server,
     1837         <p id="rfc.section.5.3.p.15"><span id="rfc.iref.a.4"></span> The asterisk-form of request-target is only used for a server-wide OPTIONS request (<a href="p2-semantics.html#OPTIONS" title="OPTIONS">Section 2.3.1</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.14"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>). When a client wishes to request OPTIONS for the server as a whole, as opposed to a specific named resource of that server,
    18271838            the client <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> send only "*" (%x2A) as the request-target. For example,
    18281839         </p>
     
    19341945         <li>Keep-Alive (<a href="http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2068#section-19.7.1.1">Section 19.7.1.1</a> of <a href="#RFC2068" id="rfc.xref.RFC2068.3"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2068]</cite></a>)
    19351946         </li>
    1936          <li><a href="p7-auth.html#header.proxy-authenticate" class="smpl">Proxy-Authenticate</a> (<a href="p7-auth.html#header.proxy-authenticate" title="Proxy-Authenticate">Section 4.2</a> of <a href="#Part7" id="rfc.xref.Part7.1"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 7: Authentication">[Part7]</cite></a>)
    1937          </li>
    1938          <li><a href="p7-auth.html#header.proxy-authorization" class="smpl">Proxy-Authorization</a> (<a href="p7-auth.html#header.proxy-authorization" title="Proxy-Authorization">Section 4.3</a> of <a href="#Part7" id="rfc.xref.Part7.2"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 7: Authentication">[Part7]</cite></a>)
     1947         <li><a href="p7-auth.html#header.proxy-authenticate" class="smpl">Proxy-Authenticate</a> (<a href="p7-auth.html#header.proxy-authenticate" title="Proxy-Authenticate">Section 4.2</a> of <a href="#Part7" id="rfc.xref.Part7.2"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 7: Authentication">[Part7]</cite></a>)
     1948         </li>
     1949         <li><a href="p7-auth.html#header.proxy-authorization" class="smpl">Proxy-Authorization</a> (<a href="p7-auth.html#header.proxy-authorization" title="Proxy-Authorization">Section 4.3</a> of <a href="#Part7" id="rfc.xref.Part7.3"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 7: Authentication">[Part7]</cite></a>)
    19391950         </li>
    19401951         <li><a href="#header.te" class="smpl">TE</a></li>
     
    19531964      </p>
    19541965      <ul>
    1955          <li><a href="p2-semantics.html#header.allow" class="smpl">Allow</a> (<a href="p2-semantics.html#header.allow" title="Allow">Section 9.5</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.14"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>)
    1956          </li>
    1957          <li><a href="p2-semantics.html#header.content-location" class="smpl">Content-Location</a> (<a href="p2-semantics.html#header.content-location" title="Content-Location">Section 9.8</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.15"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>)
    1958          </li>
    1959          <li>Content-MD5 (<a href="http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2616#section-14.15">Section 14.15</a> of <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.4"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2616]</cite></a>)
    1960          </li>
    1961          <li><a href="p4-conditional.html#header.etag" class="smpl">ETag</a> (<a href="p4-conditional.html#header.etag" title="ETag">Section 2.3</a> of <a href="#Part4" id="rfc.xref.Part4.3"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 4: Conditional Requests">[Part4]</cite></a>)
    1962          </li>
    1963          <li><a href="p4-conditional.html#header.last-modified" class="smpl">Last-Modified</a> (<a href="p4-conditional.html#header.last-modified" title="Last-Modified">Section 2.2</a> of <a href="#Part4" id="rfc.xref.Part4.4"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 4: Conditional Requests">[Part4]</cite></a>)
    1964          </li>
    1965          <li><a href="p2-semantics.html#header.server" class="smpl">Server</a> (<a href="p2-semantics.html#header.server" title="Server">Section 9.17</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.16"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>)
     1966         <li><a href="p2-semantics.html#header.allow" class="smpl">Allow</a> (<a href="p2-semantics.html#header.allow" title="Allow">Section 9.5</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.15"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>)
     1967         </li>
     1968         <li><a href="p2-semantics.html#header.content-location" class="smpl">Content-Location</a> (<a href="p2-semantics.html#header.content-location" title="Content-Location">Section 9.8</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.16"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>)
     1969         </li>
     1970         <li>Content-MD5 (<a href="http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2616#section-14.15">Section 14.15</a> of <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.3"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2616]</cite></a>)
     1971         </li>
     1972         <li><a href="p4-conditional.html#header.etag" class="smpl">ETag</a> (<a href="p4-conditional.html#header.etag" title="ETag">Section 2.3</a> of <a href="#Part4" id="rfc.xref.Part4.4"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 4: Conditional Requests">[Part4]</cite></a>)
     1973         </li>
     1974         <li><a href="p4-conditional.html#header.last-modified" class="smpl">Last-Modified</a> (<a href="p4-conditional.html#header.last-modified" title="Last-Modified">Section 2.2</a> of <a href="#Part4" id="rfc.xref.Part4.5"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 4: Conditional Requests">[Part4]</cite></a>)
     1975         </li>
     1976         <li><a href="p2-semantics.html#header.server" class="smpl">Server</a> (<a href="p2-semantics.html#header.server" title="Server">Section 9.17</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.17"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>)
    19661977         </li>
    19671978      </ul>
     
    19691980      </p>
    19701981      <ul>
    1971          <li><a href="p6-cache.html#header.expires" class="smpl">Expires</a> (<a href="p6-cache.html#header.expires" title="Expires">Section 7.3</a> of <a href="#Part6" id="rfc.xref.Part6.6"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 6: Caching">[Part6]</cite></a>)
     1982         <li><a href="p6-cache.html#header.expires" class="smpl">Expires</a> (<a href="p6-cache.html#header.expires" title="Expires">Section 7.3</a> of <a href="#Part6" id="rfc.xref.Part6.7"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 6: Caching">[Part6]</cite></a>)
    19721983         </li>
    19731984      </ul>
     
    19771988      </p>
    19781989      <ul>
    1979          <li><a href="p2-semantics.html#header.content-encoding" class="smpl">Content-Encoding</a> (<a href="p2-semantics.html#header.content-encoding" title="Content-Encoding">Section 9.6</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.17"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>)
    1980          </li>
    1981          <li><a href="p5-range.html#header.content-range" class="smpl">Content-Range</a> (<a href="p5-range.html#header.content-range" title="Content-Range">Section 5.2</a> of <a href="#Part5" id="rfc.xref.Part5.1"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 5: Range Requests and Partial Responses">[Part5]</cite></a>)
    1982          </li>
    1983          <li><a href="p2-semantics.html#header.content-type" class="smpl">Content-Type</a> (<a href="p2-semantics.html#header.content-type" title="Content-Type">Section 9.9</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.18"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>)
    1984          </li>
    1985       </ul>
    1986       <p id="rfc.section.5.6.2.p.6">A transforming proxy <em class="bcp14">MAY</em> modify or add these fields to a message that does not include no-transform, but if it does so, it <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> add a Warning 214 (Transformation applied) if one does not already appear in the message (see <a href="p6-cache.html#header.warning" title="Warning">Section 7.6</a> of <a href="#Part6" id="rfc.xref.Part6.7"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 6: Caching">[Part6]</cite></a>).
     1990         <li><a href="p2-semantics.html#header.content-encoding" class="smpl">Content-Encoding</a> (<a href="p2-semantics.html#header.content-encoding" title="Content-Encoding">Section 9.6</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.18"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>)
     1991         </li>
     1992         <li><a href="p5-range.html#header.content-range" class="smpl">Content-Range</a> (<a href="p5-range.html#header.content-range" title="Content-Range">Section 5.2</a> of <a href="#Part5" id="rfc.xref.Part5.2"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 5: Range Requests and Partial Responses">[Part5]</cite></a>)
     1993         </li>
     1994         <li><a href="p2-semantics.html#header.content-type" class="smpl">Content-Type</a> (<a href="p2-semantics.html#header.content-type" title="Content-Type">Section 9.9</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.19"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>)
     1995         </li>
     1996      </ul>
     1997      <p id="rfc.section.5.6.2.p.6">A transforming proxy <em class="bcp14">MAY</em> modify or add these fields to a message that does not include no-transform, but if it does so, it <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> add a Warning 214 (Transformation applied) if one does not already appear in the message (see <a href="p6-cache.html#header.warning" title="Warning">Section 7.6</a> of <a href="#Part6" id="rfc.xref.Part6.8"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 6: Caching">[Part6]</cite></a>).
    19871998      </p>
    19881999      <div class="note" id="rfc.section.5.6.2.p.7">
     
    19912002         </p>
    19922003      </div>
    1993       <p id="rfc.section.5.6.2.p.8">A non-transforming proxy <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> preserve the message payload (<a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.19"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>), though it <em class="bcp14">MAY</em> change the message body through application or removal of a transfer-coding (<a href="#transfer.codings" title="Transfer Codings">Section&nbsp;4</a>).
     2004      <p id="rfc.section.5.6.2.p.8">A non-transforming proxy <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> preserve the message payload (<a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.20"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>), though it <em class="bcp14">MAY</em> change the message body through application or removal of a transfer-coding (<a href="#transfer.codings" title="Transfer Codings">Section&nbsp;4</a>).
    19942005      </p>
    19952006      <h2 id="rfc.section.5.7"><a href="#rfc.section.5.7">5.7</a>&nbsp;<a id="associating.response.to.request" href="#associating.response.to.request">Associating a Response to a Request</a></h2>
    19962007      <p id="rfc.section.5.7.p.1">HTTP does not include a request identifier for associating a given request message with its corresponding one or more response
    19972008         messages. Hence, it relies on the order of response arrival to correspond exactly to the order in which requests are made
    1998          on the same connection. More than one response message per request only occurs when one or more informational responses (<a href="p2-semantics.html#status.1xx" class="smpl">1xx</a>, see <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.1xx" title="Informational 1xx">Section 4.3</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.20"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>) precede a final response to the same request.
     2009         on the same connection. More than one response message per request only occurs when one or more informational responses (<a href="p2-semantics.html#status.1xx" class="smpl">1xx</a>, see <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.1xx" title="Informational 1xx">Section 4.3</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.21"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>) precede a final response to the same request.
    19992010      </p>
    20002011      <p id="rfc.section.5.7.p.2">A client that uses persistent connections and sends more than one request per connection <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> maintain a list of outstanding requests in the order sent on that connection and <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> associate each received response message to the highest ordered request that has not yet received a final (non-<a href="p2-semantics.html#status.1xx" class="smpl">1xx</a>) response.
     
    20202031      </p>
    20212032      <p id="rfc.section.6.1.p.6">A sender <em class="bcp14">MUST NOT</em> include field-names in the Connection header field-value for fields that are defined as expressing constraints for all recipients
    2022          in the request or response chain, such as the Cache-Control header field (<a href="p6-cache.html#header.cache-control" title="Cache-Control">Section 7.2</a> of <a href="#Part6" id="rfc.xref.Part6.8"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 6: Caching">[Part6]</cite></a>).
     2033         in the request or response chain, such as the Cache-Control header field (<a href="p6-cache.html#header.cache-control" title="Cache-Control">Section 7.2</a> of <a href="#Part6" id="rfc.xref.Part6.9"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 6: Caching">[Part6]</cite></a>).
    20232034      </p>
    20242035      <p id="rfc.section.6.1.p.7">The connection options do not have to correspond to a header field present in the message, since a connection-specific header
     
    21412152      <p id="rfc.section.6.3.2.2.p.2">Clients which assume persistent connections and pipeline immediately after connection establishment <em class="bcp14">SHOULD</em> be prepared to retry their connection if the first pipelined attempt fails. If a client does such a retry, it <em class="bcp14">MUST NOT</em> pipeline before it knows the connection is persistent. Clients <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> also be prepared to resend their requests if the server closes the connection before sending all of the corresponding responses.
    21422153      </p>
    2143       <p id="rfc.section.6.3.2.2.p.3">Clients <em class="bcp14">SHOULD NOT</em> pipeline requests using non-idempotent request methods or non-idempotent sequences of request methods (see <a href="p2-semantics.html#idempotent.methods" title="Idempotent Methods">Section 2.1.2</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.21"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>). Otherwise, a premature termination of the transport connection could lead to indeterminate results. A client wishing to
     2154      <p id="rfc.section.6.3.2.2.p.3">Clients <em class="bcp14">SHOULD NOT</em> pipeline requests using non-idempotent request methods or non-idempotent sequences of request methods (see <a href="p2-semantics.html#idempotent.methods" title="Idempotent Methods">Section 2.1.2</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.22"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>). Otherwise, a premature termination of the transport connection could lead to indeterminate results. A client wishing to
    21442155         send a non-idempotent request <em class="bcp14">SHOULD</em> wait to send that request until it has received the response status line for the previous request.
    21452156      </p>
     
    21712182      <h3 id="rfc.section.6.3.4"><a href="#rfc.section.6.3.4">6.3.4</a>&nbsp;<a id="persistent.retrying.requests" href="#persistent.retrying.requests">Retrying Requests</a></h3>
    21722183      <p id="rfc.section.6.3.4.p.1">Senders can close the transport connection at any time. Therefore, clients, servers, and proxies <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> be able to recover from asynchronous close events. Client software <em class="bcp14">MAY</em> reopen the transport connection and retransmit the aborted sequence of requests without user interaction so long as the request
    2173          sequence is idempotent (see <a href="p2-semantics.html#idempotent.methods" title="Idempotent Methods">Section 2.1.2</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.22"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>). Non-idempotent request methods or sequences <em class="bcp14">MUST NOT</em> be automatically retried, although user agents <em class="bcp14">MAY</em> offer a human operator the choice of retrying the request(s). Confirmation by user-agent software with semantic understanding
     2184         sequence is idempotent (see <a href="p2-semantics.html#idempotent.methods" title="Idempotent Methods">Section 2.1.2</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.23"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>). Non-idempotent request methods or sequences <em class="bcp14">MUST NOT</em> be automatically retried, although user agents <em class="bcp14">MAY</em> offer a human operator the choice of retrying the request(s). Confirmation by user-agent software with semantic understanding
    21742185         of the application <em class="bcp14">MAY</em> substitute for user confirmation. The automatic retry <em class="bcp14">SHOULD NOT</em> be repeated if the second sequence of requests fails.
    21752186      </p>
     
    21842195      </p>
    21852196      <h3 id="rfc.section.6.4.3"><a href="#rfc.section.6.4.3">6.4.3</a>&nbsp;<a id="use.of.the.100.status" href="#use.of.the.100.status">Use of the 100 (Continue) Status</a></h3>
    2186       <p id="rfc.section.6.4.3.p.1">The purpose of the <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.100" class="smpl">100 (Continue)</a> status code (see <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.100" title="100 Continue">Section 4.3.1</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.23"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>) is to allow a client that is sending a request message with a request body to determine if the origin server is willing
     2197      <p id="rfc.section.6.4.3.p.1">The purpose of the <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.100" class="smpl">100 (Continue)</a> status code (see <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.100" title="100 Continue">Section 4.3.1</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.24"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>) is to allow a client that is sending a request message with a request body to determine if the origin server is willing
    21872198         to accept the request (based on the request header fields) before the client sends the request body. In some cases, it might
    21882199         either be inappropriate or highly inefficient for the client to send the body if the server will reject the message without
     
    21912202      <p id="rfc.section.6.4.3.p.2">Requirements for HTTP/1.1 clients: </p>
    21922203      <ul>
    2193          <li>If a client will wait for a <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.100" class="smpl">100 (Continue)</a> response before sending the request body, it <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> send an <a href="p2-semantics.html#header.expect" class="smpl">Expect</a> header field (<a href="p2-semantics.html#header.expect" title="Expect">Section 9.11</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.24"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>) with the "100-continue" expectation.
     2204         <li>If a client will wait for a <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.100" class="smpl">100 (Continue)</a> response before sending the request body, it <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> send an <a href="p2-semantics.html#header.expect" class="smpl">Expect</a> header field (<a href="p2-semantics.html#header.expect" title="Expect">Section 9.11</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.25"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>) with the "100-continue" expectation.
    21942205         </li>
    21952206         <li>A client <em class="bcp14">MUST NOT</em> send an <a href="p2-semantics.html#header.expect" class="smpl">Expect</a> header field with the "100-continue" expectation if it does not intend to send a request body.
     
    22292240         <li>Proxies <em class="bcp14">SHOULD</em> maintain a record of the HTTP version numbers received from recently-referenced next-hop servers.
    22302241         </li>
    2231          <li>A proxy <em class="bcp14">MUST NOT</em> forward a <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.100" class="smpl">100 (Continue)</a> response if the request message was received from an HTTP/1.0 (or earlier) client and did not include an <a href="p2-semantics.html#header.expect" class="smpl">Expect</a> header field with the "100-continue" expectation. This requirement overrides the general rule for forwarding of <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.1xx" class="smpl">1xx</a> responses (see <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.1xx" title="Informational 1xx">Section 4.3</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.25"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>).
     2242         <li>A proxy <em class="bcp14">MUST NOT</em> forward a <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.100" class="smpl">100 (Continue)</a> response if the request message was received from an HTTP/1.0 (or earlier) client and did not include an <a href="p2-semantics.html#header.expect" class="smpl">Expect</a> header field with the "100-continue" expectation. This requirement overrides the general rule for forwarding of <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.1xx" class="smpl">1xx</a> responses (see <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.1xx" title="Informational 1xx">Section 4.3</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.26"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>).
    22322243         </li>
    22332244      </ul>
     
    22662277      </p>
    22672278      <p id="rfc.section.6.5.p.8">The Upgrade header field cannot be used to indicate a switch to a protocol on a different connection. For that purpose, it
    2268          is more appropriate to use a <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.3xx" class="smpl">3xx (Redirection)</a> response (<a href="p2-semantics.html#status.3xx" title="Redirection 3xx">Section 4.5</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.26"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>).
     2279         is more appropriate to use a <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.3xx" class="smpl">3xx (Redirection)</a> response (<a href="p2-semantics.html#status.3xx" title="Redirection 3xx">Section 4.5</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.27"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>).
    22692280      </p>
    22702281      <p id="rfc.section.6.5.p.9">Servers <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> include the "Upgrade" header field in <a href="p2-semantics.html#status.101" class="smpl">101 (Switching
     
    25302541         <li>Pointer to specification text</li>
    25312542      </ul>
    2532       <p id="rfc.section.7.4.p.3">Names of transfer codings <em class="bcp14">MUST NOT</em> overlap with names of content codings (<a href="p2-semantics.html#content.codings" title="Content Codings">Section 5.4</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.27"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>) unless the encoding transformation is identical, as it is the case for the compression codings defined in <a href="#compression.codings" title="Compression Codings">Section&nbsp;4.2</a>.
     2543      <p id="rfc.section.7.4.p.3">Names of transfer codings <em class="bcp14">MUST NOT</em> overlap with names of content codings (<a href="p2-semantics.html#content.codings" title="Content Codings">Section 5.4</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.28"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>) unless the encoding transformation is identical, as it is the case for the compression codings defined in <a href="#compression.codings" title="Compression Codings">Section&nbsp;4.2</a>.
    25332544      </p>
    25342545      <p id="rfc.section.7.4.p.4">Values to be added to this name space require IETF Review (see <a href="http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5226#section-4.1">Section 4.1</a> of <a href="#RFC5226" id="rfc.xref.RFC5226.1"><cite title="Guidelines for Writing an IANA Considerations Section in RFCs">[RFC5226]</cite></a>), and <em class="bcp14">MUST</em> conform to the purpose of transfer coding defined in this section.
     
    26892700         that most implementations will choose substantially higher limits.
    26902701      </p>
    2691       <p id="rfc.section.8.6.p.3">This specification also provides a way for servers to reject messages that have request-targets that are too long (<a href="p2-semantics.html#status.414" title="414 URI Too Long">Section 4.6.12</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.28"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>) or request entities that are too large (<a href="p2-semantics.html#status.4xx" title="Client Error 4xx">Section 4.6</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.29"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>).
     2702      <p id="rfc.section.8.6.p.3">This specification also provides a way for servers to reject messages that have request-targets that are too long (<a href="p2-semantics.html#status.414" title="414 URI Too Long">Section 4.6.12</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.29"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>) or request entities that are too large (<a href="p2-semantics.html#status.4xx" title="Client Error 4xx">Section 4.6</a> of <a href="#Part2" id="rfc.xref.Part2.30"><cite title="HTTP/1.1, part 2: Message Semantics, Payload and Content Negotiation">[Part2]</cite></a>).
    26922703      </p>
    26932704      <p id="rfc.section.8.6.p.4">Other fields (including but not limited to request methods, response status phrases, header field-names, and body chunks) <em class="bcp14">SHOULD</em> be limited by implementations carefully, so as to not impede interoperability.
    26942705      </p>
    26952706      <h1 id="rfc.section.9"><a href="#rfc.section.9">9.</a>&nbsp;<a id="acks" href="#acks">Acknowledgments</a></h1>
    2696       <p id="rfc.section.9.p.1">This edition of HTTP builds on the many contributions that went into <a href="#RFC1945" id="rfc.xref.RFC1945.2">RFC 1945</a>, <a href="#RFC2068" id="rfc.xref.RFC2068.6">RFC 2068</a>, <a href="#RFC2145" id="rfc.xref.RFC2145.3">RFC 2145</a>, and <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.5">RFC 2616</a>, including substantial contributions made by the previous authors, editors, and working group chairs: Tim Berners-Lee, Ari
     2707      <p id="rfc.section.9.p.1">This edition of HTTP builds on the many contributions that went into <a href="#RFC1945" id="rfc.xref.RFC1945.2">RFC 1945</a>, <a href="#RFC2068" id="rfc.xref.RFC2068.6">RFC 2068</a>, <a href="#RFC2145" id="rfc.xref.RFC2145.2">RFC 2145</a>, and <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.4">RFC 2616</a>, including substantial contributions made by the previous authors, editors, and working group chairs: Tim Berners-Lee, Ari
    26972708         Luotonen, Roy T. Fielding, Henrik Frystyk Nielsen, Jim Gettys, Jeffrey C. Mogul, Larry Masinter, Paul J. Leach, and Mark Nottingham.
    2698          See <a href="http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2616#section-16">Section 16</a> of <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.6"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2616]</cite></a> for additional acknowledgements from prior revisions.
     2709         See <a href="http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2616#section-16">Section 16</a> of <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.5"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2616]</cite></a> for additional acknowledgements from prior revisions.
    26992710      </p>
    27002711      <p id="rfc.section.9.p.2">Since 1999, the following contributors have helped improve the HTTP specification by reporting bugs, asking smart questions,
     
    31613172      <h2 id="rfc.section.C.1"><a href="#rfc.section.C.1">C.1</a>&nbsp;Since RFC 2616
    31623173      </h2>
    3163       <p id="rfc.section.C.1.p.1">Extracted relevant partitions from <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.7"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2616]</cite></a>.
     3174      <p id="rfc.section.C.1.p.1">Extracted relevant partitions from <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.6"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2616]</cite></a>.
    31643175      </p>
    31653176      <h2 id="rfc.section.C.2"><a href="#rfc.section.C.2">C.2</a>&nbsp;Since draft-ietf-httpbis-p1-messaging-00
     
    37593770            <li><a id="rfc.index.P" href="#rfc.index.P"><b>P</b></a><ul>
    37603771                  <li><em>Pad1995</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Pad1995.1">6.3.1</a>, <a href="#Pad1995"><b>10.2</b></a></li>
    3761                   <li><em>Part2</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.1">1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.2">2.4</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.3">2.8.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.4">3.1.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.5">3.1.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.6">3.1.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.7">3.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.8">3.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.9">3.3.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.10">4.3.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.11">5.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.12">5.3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.13">5.3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.14">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.15">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.16">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.17">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.18">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.19">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.20">5.7</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.21">6.3.2.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.22">6.3.4</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.23">6.4.3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.24">6.4.3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.25">6.4.3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.26">6.5</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.27">7.4</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.28">8.6</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.29">8.6</a>, <a href="#Part2"><b>10.1</b></a><ul>
    3762                         <li><em>Section 2</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.4">3.1.1</a></li>
    3763                         <li><em>Section 2.1.2</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.21">6.3.2.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.22">6.3.4</a></li>
    3764                         <li><em>Section 2.3.1</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.13">5.3</a></li>
    3765                         <li><em>Section 2.3.8</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.12">5.3</a></li>
    3766                         <li><em>Section 3.1</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.8">3.2</a></li>
    3767                         <li><em>Section 4</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.3">2.8.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.6">3.1.2</a></li>
    3768                         <li><em>Section 4.3</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.20">5.7</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.25">6.4.3</a></li>
    3769                         <li><em>Section 4.3.1</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.23">6.4.3</a></li>
    3770                         <li><em>Section 4.4.4</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.2">2.4</a></li>
    3771                         <li><em>Section 4.5</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.26">6.5</a></li>
    3772                         <li><em>Section 4.6</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.29">8.6</a></li>
    3773                         <li><em>Section 4.6.12</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.5">3.1.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.28">8.6</a></li>
    3774                         <li><em>Section 5.4</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.9">3.3.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.27">7.4</a></li>
    3775                         <li><em>Section 8</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.10">4.3.1</a></li>
    3776                         <li><em>Section 9.5</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.14">5.6.2</a></li>
    3777                         <li><em>Section 9.6</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.17">5.6.2</a></li>
    3778                         <li><em>Section 9.8</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.15">5.6.2</a></li>
    3779                         <li><em>Section 9.9</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.18">5.6.2</a></li>
    3780                         <li><em>Section 9.10</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.7">3.2</a></li>
    3781                         <li><em>Section 9.11</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.24">6.4.3</a></li>
    3782                         <li><em>Section 9.17</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.16">5.6.2</a></li>
    3783                         <li><em>Appendix A</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.1">1</a></li>
     3772                  <li><em>Part2</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.1">1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.2">2.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.3">2.4</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.4">2.8.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.5">3.1.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.6">3.1.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.7">3.1.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.8">3.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.9">3.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.10">3.3.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.11">4.3.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.12">5.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.13">5.3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.14">5.3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.15">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.16">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.17">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.18">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.19">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.20">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.21">5.7</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.22">6.3.2.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.23">6.3.4</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.24">6.4.3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.25">6.4.3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.26">6.4.3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.27">6.5</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.28">7.4</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.29">8.6</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.30">8.6</a>, <a href="#Part2"><b>10.1</b></a><ul>
     3773                        <li><em>Section 2</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.5">3.1.1</a></li>
     3774                        <li><em>Section 2.1.2</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.22">6.3.2.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.23">6.3.4</a></li>
     3775                        <li><em>Section 2.3.1</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.14">5.3</a></li>
     3776                        <li><em>Section 2.3.8</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.13">5.3</a></li>
     3777                        <li><em>Section 3.1</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.9">3.2</a></li>
     3778                        <li><em>Section 4</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.4">2.8.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.7">3.1.2</a></li>
     3779                        <li><em>Section 4.3</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.21">5.7</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.26">6.4.3</a></li>
     3780                        <li><em>Section 4.3.1</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.24">6.4.3</a></li>
     3781                        <li><em>Section 4.4.4</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.3">2.4</a></li>
     3782                        <li><em>Section 4.5</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.27">6.5</a></li>
     3783                        <li><em>Section 4.6</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.30">8.6</a></li>
     3784                        <li><em>Section 4.6.12</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.6">3.1.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.29">8.6</a></li>
     3785                        <li><em>Section 5.4</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.10">3.3.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.28">7.4</a></li>
     3786                        <li><em>Section 8</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.11">4.3.1</a></li>
     3787                        <li><em>Section 9.5</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.15">5.6.2</a></li>
     3788                        <li><em>Section 9.6</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.18">5.6.2</a></li>
     3789                        <li><em>Section 9.8</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.16">5.6.2</a></li>
     3790                        <li><em>Section 9.9</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.19">5.6.2</a></li>
     3791                        <li><em>Section 9.10</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.8">3.2</a></li>
     3792                        <li><em>Section 9.11</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.25">6.4.3</a></li>
     3793                        <li><em>Section 9.17</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.17">5.6.2</a></li>
     3794                        <li><em>Appendix A</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part2.2">2.1</a></li>
    37843795                     </ul>
    37853796                  </li>
    3786                   <li><em>Part4</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part4.1">3.3.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part4.2">3.3.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part4.3">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part4.4">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#Part4"><b>10.1</b></a><ul>
    3787                         <li><em>Section 2.2</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part4.4">5.6.2</a></li>
    3788                         <li><em>Section 2.3</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part4.3">5.6.2</a></li>
    3789                         <li><em>Section 4.1</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part4.1">3.3.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part4.2">3.3.2</a></li>
     3797                  <li><em>Part4</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part4.1">1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part4.2">3.3.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part4.3">3.3.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part4.4">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part4.5">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#Part4"><b>10.1</b></a><ul>
     3798                        <li><em>Section 2.2</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part4.5">5.6.2</a></li>
     3799                        <li><em>Section 2.3</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part4.4">5.6.2</a></li>
     3800                        <li><em>Section 4.1</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part4.2">3.3.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part4.3">3.3.2</a></li>
    37903801                     </ul>
    37913802                  </li>
    3792                   <li><em>Part5</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part5.1">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#Part5"><b>10.1</b></a><ul>
    3793                         <li><em>Section 5.2</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part5.1">5.6.2</a></li>
     3803                  <li><em>Part5</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part5.1">1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part5.2">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#Part5"><b>10.1</b></a><ul>
     3804                        <li><em>Section 5.2</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part5.2">5.6.2</a></li>
    37943805                     </ul>
    37953806                  </li>
    3796                   <li><em>Part6</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.1">2.4</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.2">2.5</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.3">2.8.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.4">3.4</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.5">5.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.6">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.7">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.8">6.1</a>, <a href="#Part6"><b>10.1</b></a><ul>
    3797                         <li><em>Section 2</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.2">2.5</a></li>
    3798                         <li><em>Section 3</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.4">3.4</a></li>
    3799                         <li><em>Section 7.2</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.3">2.8.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.8">6.1</a></li>
    3800                         <li><em>Section 7.3</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.6">5.6.2</a></li>
    3801                         <li><em>Section 7.6</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.1">2.4</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.7">5.6.2</a></li>
     3807                  <li><em>Part6</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.1">1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.2">2.4</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.3">2.5</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.4">2.8.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.5">3.4</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.6">5.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.7">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.8">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.9">6.1</a>, <a href="#Part6"><b>10.1</b></a><ul>
     3808                        <li><em>Section 2</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.3">2.5</a></li>
     3809                        <li><em>Section 3</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.5">3.4</a></li>
     3810                        <li><em>Section 7.2</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.4">2.8.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.9">6.1</a></li>
     3811                        <li><em>Section 7.3</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.7">5.6.2</a></li>
     3812                        <li><em>Section 7.6</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.2">2.4</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part6.8">5.6.2</a></li>
    38023813                     </ul>
    38033814                  </li>
    3804                   <li><em>Part7</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part7.1">5.6.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part7.2">5.6.1</a>, <a href="#Part7"><b>10.1</b></a><ul>
    3805                         <li><em>Section 4.2</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part7.1">5.6.1</a></li>
    3806                         <li><em>Section 4.3</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part7.2">5.6.1</a></li>
     3815                  <li><em>Part7</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part7.1">1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part7.2">5.6.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.Part7.3">5.6.1</a>, <a href="#Part7"><b>10.1</b></a><ul>
     3816                        <li><em>Section 4.2</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part7.2">5.6.1</a></li>
     3817                        <li><em>Section 4.3</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.Part7.3">5.6.1</a></li>
    38073818                     </ul>
    38083819                  </li>
     
    38223833                  <li><em>RFC1951</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC1951.1">4.2.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC1951.2">7.5</a>, <a href="#RFC1951"><b>10.1</b></a></li>
    38233834                  <li><em>RFC1952</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC1952.1">4.2.3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC1952.2">7.5</a>, <a href="#RFC1952"><b>10.1</b></a></li>
    3824                   <li><em>RFC2045</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2045.1">1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2045.2">3.3.1</a>, <a href="#RFC2045"><b>10.2</b></a><ul>
     3835                  <li><em>RFC2045</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2045.1">2.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2045.2">3.3.1</a>, <a href="#RFC2045"><b>10.2</b></a><ul>
    38253836                        <li><em>Section 6</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2045.2">3.3.1</a></li>
    38263837                     </ul>
    38273838                  </li>
    38283839                  <li><em>RFC2047</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2047.1">3.2.2</a>, <a href="#RFC2047"><b>10.2</b></a></li>
    3829                   <li><em>RFC2068</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2068.1">§</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2068.2">2.7</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2068.3">5.6.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2068.4">6.3.2.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2068.5">6.4.3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2068.6">9</a>, <a href="#RFC2068"><b>10.2</b></a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2068.7">A.1.2</a><ul>
     3840                  <li><em>RFC2068</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2068.1">1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2068.2">2.7</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2068.3">5.6.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2068.4">6.3.2.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2068.5">6.4.3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2068.6">9</a>, <a href="#RFC2068"><b>10.2</b></a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2068.7">A.1.2</a><ul>
    38303841                        <li><em>Section 19.7.1.1</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2068.3">5.6.1</a></li>
    38313842                        <li><em>Section 19.7.1</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2068.4">6.3.2.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2068.7">A.1.2</a></li>
     
    38333844                  </li>
    38343845                  <li><em>RFC2119</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2119.1">1.1</a>, <a href="#RFC2119"><b>10.1</b></a></li>
    3835                   <li><em>RFC2145</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2145.1">§</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2145.2">1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2145.3">9</a>, <a href="#RFC2145"><b>10.2</b></a></li>
    3836                   <li><em>RFC2616</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.1">§</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.2">1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.3">2.7</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.4">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.5">9</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.6">9</a>, <a href="#RFC2616"><b>10.2</b></a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.7">C.1</a><ul>
    3837                         <li><em>Section 14.15</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.4">5.6.2</a></li>
    3838                         <li><em>Section 16</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.6">9</a></li>
     3846                  <li><em>RFC2145</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2145.1">1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2145.2">9</a>, <a href="#RFC2145"><b>10.2</b></a></li>
     3847                  <li><em>RFC2616</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.1">1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.2">2.7</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.3">5.6.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.4">9</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.5">9</a>, <a href="#RFC2616"><b>10.2</b></a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.6">C.1</a><ul>
     3848                        <li><em>Section 14.15</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.3">5.6.2</a></li>
     3849                        <li><em>Section 16</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.5">9</a></li>
    38393850                     </ul>
    38403851                  </li>
    3841                   <li><em>RFC2817</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2817.1">§</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2817.2">7.6</a>, <a href="#RFC2817"><b>10.2</b></a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2817.3">A.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2817.4">A.2</a><ul>
     3852                  <li><em>RFC2817</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2817.1">1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2817.2">7.6</a>, <a href="#RFC2817"><b>10.2</b></a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2817.3">A.2</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2817.4">A.2</a><ul>
    38423853                        <li><em>Section 7.2</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2817.2">7.6</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC2817.4">A.2</a></li>
    38433854                     </ul>
     
    38473858                  <li><em>RFC3040</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3040.1">2.4</a>, <a href="#RFC3040"><b>10.2</b></a></li>
    38483859                  <li><em>RFC3864</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3864.1">7.1</a>, <a href="#RFC3864"><b>10.2</b></a></li>
    3849                   <li><em>RFC3986</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.1">1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.2">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.3">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.4">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.5">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.6">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.7">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.8">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.9">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.10">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.11">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.12">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.13">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.14">2.8.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.15">2.8.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.16">2.8.3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.17">2.8.3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.18">5.1</a>, <a href="#RFC3986"><b>10.1</b></a><ul>
     3860                  <li><em>RFC3986</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.1">2.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.2">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.3">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.4">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.5">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.6">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.7">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.8">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.9">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.10">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.11">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.12">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.13">2.8</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.14">2.8.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.15">2.8.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.16">2.8.3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.17">2.8.3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.18">5.1</a>, <a href="#RFC3986"><b>10.1</b></a><ul>
    38503861                        <li><em>Section 2.1</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.17">2.8.3</a></li>
    38513862                        <li><em>Section 3.2</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC3986.8">2.8</a></li>
     
    38743885                     </ul>
    38753886                  </li>
    3876                   <li><em>RFC5322</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC5322.1">1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC5322.2">3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC5322.3">6.2</a>, <a href="#RFC5322"><b>10.2</b></a><ul>
     3887                  <li><em>RFC5322</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC5322.1">2.1</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC5322.2">3</a>, <a href="#rfc.xref.RFC5322.3">6.2</a>, <a href="#RFC5322"><b>10.2</b></a><ul>
    38773888                        <li><em>Section 3.6.7</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="#rfc.xref.RFC5322.3">6.2</a></li>
    38783889                     </ul>
  • draft-ietf-httpbis/latest/p1-messaging.xml

    r1780 r1785  
    128128   The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is an application-level protocol for
    129129   distributed, collaborative, hypertext information systems. HTTP has been in
    130    use by the World Wide Web global information initiative since 1990. This
    131    document is Part 1 of the seven-part specification that defines the protocol
    132    referred to as "HTTP/1.1" and, taken together, obsoletes
    133    <xref target="RFC2616" x:fmt="none">RFC 2616</xref> and moves it to historic
    134    status, along with its predecessor <xref target="RFC2068" x:fmt="none">RFC
    135    2068</xref>.
    136 </t>
    137 <t>
    138    Part 1 provides an overview of HTTP and its associated terminology, defines
    139    the "http" and "https" Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) schemes, defines
    140    the generic message syntax and parsing requirements for HTTP message frames,
     130   use by the World Wide Web global information initiative since 1990.
     131   This document provides an overview of HTTP architecture and its associated
     132   terminology, defines the "http" and "https" Uniform Resource Identifier
     133   (URI) schemes, defines the HTTP/1.1 message syntax and parsing requirements,
    141134   and describes general security concerns for implementations.
    142 </t>
    143 <t>
    144    This part also obsoletes RFCs <xref target="RFC2145" x:fmt="none">2145</xref>
    145    (on HTTP version numbers) and <xref target="RFC2817" x:fmt="none">2817</xref>
    146    (on using CONNECT for TLS upgrades) and moves them to historic status.
    147 </t>
     135</t>   
    148136</abstract>
    149137
     
    171159   request/response protocol that uses extensible semantics and MIME-like
    172160   message payloads for flexible interaction with network-based hypertext
    173    information systems. HTTP relies upon the Uniform Resource Identifier (URI)
    174    standard <xref target="RFC3986"/> to indicate the target resource
    175    (<xref target="target-resource"/>) and relationships between resources.
    176    Messages are passed in a format similar to that used by Internet mail
    177    <xref target="RFC5322"/> and the Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
    178    (MIME) <xref target="RFC2045"/> (see &diff-mime; for the differences
    179    between HTTP and MIME messages).
     161   information systems. This document is the first in a series of documents
     162   that collectively form the HTTP/1.1 specification:
     163   <list style="empty">
     164    <t>RFC xxx1: URIs, Connections, and Message Parsing</t>
     165    <t><xref target="Part2" x:fmt="none">RFC xxx2</xref>: Core Semantics</t>
     166    <t><xref target="Part4" x:fmt="none">RFC xxx4</xref>: Conditional Requests</t>
     167    <t><xref target="Part5" x:fmt="none">RFC xxx5</xref>: Range Requests</t>
     168    <t><xref target="Part6" x:fmt="none">RFC xxx6</xref>: Caching</t>
     169    <t><xref target="Part7" x:fmt="none">RFC xxx7</xref>: Authentication</t>
     170   </list>
     171</t>
     172<t>
     173   This HTTP/1,1 specification obsoletes and moves to historic status
     174   <xref target="RFC2616" x:fmt="none">RFC 2616</xref>, its predecessor
     175   <xref target="RFC2068" x:fmt="none">RFC 2068</xref>,
     176   <xref target="RFC2145" x:fmt="none">RFC 2145</xref> (on HTTP versioning),
     177   and <xref target="RFC2817" x:fmt="none">RFC 2817</xref> (on using CONNECT
     178   for TLS upgrades).
    180179</t>
    181180<t>
     
    211210</t>
    212211<t>
    213    This document is Part 1 of the seven-part specification of HTTP,
    214    defining the protocol referred to as "HTTP/1.1", obsoleting
    215    <xref target="RFC2616"/> and <xref target="RFC2145"/>.
    216    Part 1 describes the architectural elements that are used or
     212   This document describes the architectural elements that are used or
    217213   referred to in HTTP, defines the "http" and "https" URI schemes,
    218214   describes overall network operation and connection management,
     
    223219   message-forwarding intermediaries.
    224220</t>
     221
    225222
    226223<section title="Requirement Notation" anchor="intro.requirements">
     
    320317</t>
    321318<t>
     319   HTTP relies upon the Uniform Resource Identifier (URI)
     320   standard <xref target="RFC3986"/> to indicate the target resource
     321   (<xref target="target-resource"/>) and relationships between resources.
     322   Messages are passed in a format similar to that used by Internet mail
     323   <xref target="RFC5322"/> and the Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
     324   (MIME) <xref target="RFC2045"/> (see &diff-mime; for the differences
     325   between HTTP and MIME messages).
     326</t>
     327<t>
    322328   Most HTTP communication consists of a retrieval request (GET) for
    323329   a representation of some resource identified by a URI.  In the
     
    337343   message, beginning with a request-line that includes a method, URI, and
    338344   protocol version (<xref target="request.line"/>),
    339    followed by MIME-like header fields containing
     345   followed by header fields containing
    340346   request modifiers, client information, and representation metadata
    341347   (<xref target="header.fields"/>),
     
    350356   includes the protocol version, a success or error code, and textual
    351357   reason phrase (<xref target="status.line"/>),
    352    possibly followed by MIME-like header fields containing server
     358   possibly followed by header fields containing server
    353359   information, resource metadata, and representation metadata
    354360   (<xref target="header.fields"/>),
Note: See TracChangeset for help on using the changeset viewer.