Ignore:
Timestamp:
Jul 9, 2012, 4:49:50 PM (7 years ago)
Author:
mnot@…
Message:

most -> many when taking about numbers of implementations; we haven't counted.

Location:
draft-ietf-httpbis/latest
Files:
2 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • draft-ietf-httpbis/latest/p6-cache.html

    r1751 r1752  
    843843      </p>
    844844      <p id="rfc.section.2.p.3">The default <dfn>cache key</dfn> consists of the request method and target URI. However, since HTTP caches in common use today are typically limited to caching
    845          responses to GET, most implementations simply decline other methods and use only the URI as the key.
     845         responses to GET, many implementations simply decline other methods and use only the URI as the key.
    846846      </p>
    847847      <p id="rfc.section.2.p.4">If a request target is subject to content negotiation, its cache entry might consist of multiple stored responses, each differentiated
     
    879879         cache-specific behavior.
    880880      </p>
    881       <p id="rfc.section.3.p.4">Note that, in normal operation, most caches will not store a response that has neither a cache validator nor an explicit expiration
     881      <p id="rfc.section.3.p.4">Note that, in normal operation, many caches will not store a response that has neither a cache validator nor an explicit expiration
    882882         time, as such responses are not usually useful to store. However, caches are not prohibited from storing such responses.
    883883      </p>
     
    13691369         case-insensitive.
    13701370      </p>
    1371       <p id="rfc.section.7.2.2.3.p.5"> <b>Note:</b> Most HTTP/1.0 caches will not recognize or obey this directive. Also, no-cache response directives with field-names are often
     1371      <p id="rfc.section.7.2.2.3.p.5"> <b>Note:</b> Many HTTP/1.0 caches will not recognize or obey this directive. Also, no-cache response directives with field-names are often
    13721372         handled by implementations as if an unqualified no-cache directive was received; i.e., the special handling for the qualified
    13731373         form is not widely implemented.
     
    14951495      <p id="rfc.section.7.3.p.8">Historically, HTTP required the Expires field-value to be no more than a year in the future. While longer freshness lifetimes
    14961496         are no longer prohibited, extremely large values have been demonstrated to cause problems (e.g., clock overflows due to use
    1497          of 32-bit integers for time values), and most caches will evict a response far sooner than that. Therefore, senders ought
     1497         of 32-bit integers for time values), and many caches will evict a response far sooner than that. Therefore, senders ought
    14981498         not produce them.
    14991499      </p>
  • draft-ietf-httpbis/latest/p6-cache.xml

    r1751 r1752  
    444444   The default <x:dfn>cache key</x:dfn> consists of the request method and
    445445   target URI.  However, since HTTP caches in common use today are typically
    446    limited to caching responses to GET, most implementations simply decline
     446   limited to caching responses to GET, many implementations simply decline
    447447   other methods and use only the URI as the key.
    448448</t>
     
    499499</t>
    500500<t>
    501    Note that, in normal operation, most caches will not store a response that
     501   Note that, in normal operation, many caches will not store a response that
    502502   has neither a cache validator nor an explicit expiration time, as such
    503503   responses are not usually useful to store. However, caches are not
     
    14881488</t>
    14891489<t>
    1490    &Note; Most HTTP/1.0 caches will not recognize or obey
     1490   &Note; Many HTTP/1.0 caches will not recognize or obey
    14911491   this directive. Also, no-cache response directives with field-names are
    14921492   often handled by implementations as if an unqualified no-cache directive
     
    17391739   prohibited, extremely large values have been demonstrated to cause
    17401740   problems (e.g., clock overflows due to use of 32-bit integers for
    1741    time values), and most caches will evict a response far sooner than
     1741   time values), and many caches will evict a response far sooner than
    17421742   that. Therefore, senders ought not produce them.
    17431743</t>
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