Ignore:
Timestamp:
Jan 11, 2008, 9:09:10 PM (12 years ago)
Author:
fielding@…
Message:

editorial: make introductions more active and consistent

File:
1 edited

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  • draft-ietf-httpbis/latest/p1-messaging.xml

    r155 r163  
    227227<section title="Introduction" anchor="introduction">
    228228<t>
    229    This document will define aspects of HTTP related to overall network
    230    operation, message framing, interaction with transport protocols, and
    231    URI schemes. Right now it only includes the extracted relevant sections
    232    of <xref target="RFC2616"/>.
    233 </t>
    234 <section title="Purpose" anchor="intro.purpose">
    235 <t>
    236229   The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is an application-level
    237230   protocol for distributed, collaborative, hypermedia information
    238231   systems. HTTP has been in use by the World-Wide Web global
    239    information initiative since 1990. The first version of HTTP,
     232   information initiative since 1990. The first version of HTTP, commonly
    240233   referred to as HTTP/0.9, was a simple protocol for raw data transfer
    241    across the Internet. HTTP/1.0, as defined by <xref target="RFC1945"/>, improved
     234   across the Internet with only a single method and no metadata.
     235   HTTP/1.0, as defined by <xref target="RFC1945"/>, improved
    242236   the protocol by allowing messages to be in the format of MIME-like
    243    messages, containing metainformation about the data transferred and
    244    modifiers on the request/response semantics. However, HTTP/1.0 does
     237   messages, containing metadata about the data transferred and
     238   modifiers on the request/response semantics. However, HTTP/1.0 did
    245239   not sufficiently take into consideration the effects of hierarchical
    246    proxies, caching, the need for persistent connections, or virtual
    247    hosts. In addition, the proliferation of incompletely-implemented
    248    applications calling themselves "HTTP/1.0" has necessitated a
     240   proxies, caching, the need for persistent connections, or name-based
     241   virtual hosts. In addition, the proliferation of incompletely-implemented
     242   applications calling themselves "HTTP/1.0" necessitated a
    249243   protocol version change in order for two communicating applications
    250244   to determine each other's true capabilities.
    251245</t>
    252246<t>
    253    This specification defines the protocol referred to as "HTTP/1.1".
    254    This protocol includes more stringent requirements than HTTP/1.0 in
    255    order to ensure reliable implementation of its features.
    256 </t>
     247   This document is Part 1 of the seven-part specification that defines
     248   the protocol referred to as "HTTP/1.1", obsoleting <xref target="RFC2616"/>.
     249   HTTP/1.1 remains compatible with HTTP/1.0 by including more stringent
     250   requirements that enable reliable implementations and adding only
     251   those new features that will either be safely ignored by an HTTP/1.0
     252   recipient or only sent when communicating with a party advertising
     253   compliance with HTTP/1.1.
     254   Part 1 defines those aspects of HTTP/1.1 related to overall network
     255   operation, message framing, interaction with transport protocols, and
     256   URI schemes.
     257</t>
     258<t>
     259   This document is currently disorganized in order to minimize the changes
     260   between drafts and enable reviewers to see the smaller errata changes.
     261   The next draft will reorganize the sections to better reflect the content.
     262   In particular, the sections will be organized according to the typical
     263   process of deciding when to use HTTP (URI schemes), overall network operation,
     264   connection management, message framing, and generic message parsing.
     265   The current mess reflects how widely dispersed these topics and associated
     266   requirements had become in <xref target="RFC2616"/>.
     267</t>
     268
     269<section title="Purpose" anchor="intro.purpose">
    257270<t>
    258271   Practical information systems require more functionality than simple
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