Ignore:
Timestamp:
Jan 11, 2008, 9:09:10 PM (12 years ago)
Author:
fielding@…
Message:

editorial: make introductions more active and consistent

File:
1 edited

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  • draft-ietf-httpbis/latest/p1-messaging.html

    r157 r163  
    618618      </ul>
    619619      <h1 id="rfc.section.1" class="np"><a href="#rfc.section.1">1.</a>&nbsp;<a id="introduction" href="#introduction">Introduction</a></h1>
    620       <p id="rfc.section.1.p.1">This document will define aspects of HTTP related to overall network operation, message framing, interaction with transport
    621          protocols, and URI schemes. Right now it only includes the extracted relevant sections of <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.1"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2616]</cite></a>.
     620      <p id="rfc.section.1.p.1">The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is an application-level protocol for distributed, collaborative, hypermedia information
     621         systems. HTTP has been in use by the World-Wide Web global information initiative since 1990. The first version of HTTP, commonly
     622         referred to as HTTP/0.9, was a simple protocol for raw data transfer across the Internet with only a single method and no
     623         metadata. HTTP/1.0, as defined by <a href="#RFC1945" id="rfc.xref.RFC1945.1"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.0">[RFC1945]</cite></a>, improved the protocol by allowing messages to be in the format of MIME-like messages, containing metadata about the data
     624         transferred and modifiers on the request/response semantics. However, HTTP/1.0 did not sufficiently take into consideration
     625         the effects of hierarchical proxies, caching, the need for persistent connections, or name-based virtual hosts. In addition,
     626         the proliferation of incompletely-implemented applications calling themselves "HTTP/1.0" necessitated a protocol version change
     627         in order for two communicating applications to determine each other's true capabilities.
     628      </p>
     629      <p id="rfc.section.1.p.2">This document is Part 1 of the seven-part specification that defines the protocol referred to as "HTTP/1.1", obsoleting <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.1"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2616]</cite></a>. HTTP/1.1 remains compatible with HTTP/1.0 by including more stringent requirements that enable reliable implementations
     630         and adding only those new features that will either be safely ignored by an HTTP/1.0 recipient or only sent when communicating
     631         with a party advertising compliance with HTTP/1.1. Part 1 defines those aspects of HTTP/1.1 related to overall network operation,
     632         message framing, interaction with transport protocols, and URI schemes.
     633      </p>
     634      <p id="rfc.section.1.p.3">This document is currently disorganized in order to minimize the changes between drafts and enable reviewers to see the smaller
     635         errata changes. The next draft will reorganize the sections to better reflect the content. In particular, the sections will
     636         be organized according to the typical process of deciding when to use HTTP (URI schemes), overall network operation, connection
     637         management, message framing, and generic message parsing. The current mess reflects how widely dispersed these topics and
     638         associated requirements had become in <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.2"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2616]</cite></a>.
    622639      </p>
    623640      <h2 id="rfc.section.1.1"><a href="#rfc.section.1.1">1.1</a>&nbsp;<a id="intro.purpose" href="#intro.purpose">Purpose</a></h2>
    624       <p id="rfc.section.1.1.p.1">The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is an application-level protocol for distributed, collaborative, hypermedia information
    625          systems. HTTP has been in use by the World-Wide Web global information initiative since 1990. The first version of HTTP, referred
    626          to as HTTP/0.9, was a simple protocol for raw data transfer across the Internet. HTTP/1.0, as defined by <a href="#RFC1945" id="rfc.xref.RFC1945.1"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.0">[RFC1945]</cite></a>, improved the protocol by allowing messages to be in the format of MIME-like messages, containing metainformation about the
    627          data transferred and modifiers on the request/response semantics. However, HTTP/1.0 does not sufficiently take into consideration
    628          the effects of hierarchical proxies, caching, the need for persistent connections, or virtual hosts. In addition, the proliferation
    629          of incompletely-implemented applications calling themselves "HTTP/1.0" has necessitated a protocol version change in order
    630          for two communicating applications to determine each other's true capabilities.
    631       </p>
    632       <p id="rfc.section.1.1.p.2">This specification defines the protocol referred to as "HTTP/1.1". This protocol includes more stringent requirements than
    633          HTTP/1.0 in order to ensure reliable implementation of its features.
    634       </p>
    635       <p id="rfc.section.1.1.p.3">Practical information systems require more functionality than simple retrieval, including search, front-end update, and annotation.
     641      <p id="rfc.section.1.1.p.1">Practical information systems require more functionality than simple retrieval, including search, front-end update, and annotation.
    636642         HTTP allows an open-ended set of methods and headers that indicate the purpose of a request <a href="#RFC2324" id="rfc.xref.RFC2324.1"><cite title="Hyper Text Coffee Pot Control Protocol (HTCPCP/1.0)">[RFC2324]</cite></a>. It builds on the discipline of reference provided by the Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) <a href="#RFC1630" id="rfc.xref.RFC1630.1"><cite title="Universal Resource Identifiers in WWW: A Unifying Syntax for the Expression of Names and Addresses of Objects on the Network as used in the World-Wide Web">[RFC1630]</cite></a>, as a location (URL) <a href="#RFC1738" id="rfc.xref.RFC1738.1"><cite title="Uniform Resource Locators (URL)">[RFC1738]</cite></a> or name (URN) <a href="#RFC1737" id="rfc.xref.RFC1737.1"><cite title="Functional Requirements for Uniform Resource Names">[RFC1737]</cite></a>, for indicating the resource to which a method is to be applied. Messages are passed in a format similar to that used by
    637643         Internet mail <a href="#RFC2822" id="rfc.xref.RFC2822.1"><cite title="Internet Message Format">[RFC2822]</cite></a> as defined by the Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) <a href="#RFC2045" id="rfc.xref.RFC2045.1"><cite title="Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) Part One: Format of Internet Message Bodies">[RFC2045]</cite></a>.
    638644      </p>
    639       <p id="rfc.section.1.1.p.4">HTTP is also used as a generic protocol for communication between user agents and proxies/gateways to other Internet systems,
     645      <p id="rfc.section.1.1.p.2">HTTP is also used as a generic protocol for communication between user agents and proxies/gateways to other Internet systems,
    640646         including those supported by the SMTP <a href="#RFC2821" id="rfc.xref.RFC2821.1"><cite title="Simple Mail Transfer Protocol">[RFC2821]</cite></a>, NNTP <a href="#RFC3977" id="rfc.xref.RFC3977.1"><cite title="Network News Transfer Protocol (NNTP)">[RFC3977]</cite></a>, FTP <a href="#RFC959" id="rfc.xref.RFC959.1"><cite title="File Transfer Protocol">[RFC959]</cite></a>, Gopher <a href="#RFC1436" id="rfc.xref.RFC1436.1"><cite title="The Internet Gopher Protocol (a distributed document search and retrieval protocol)">[RFC1436]</cite></a>, and WAIS <a href="#WAIS" id="rfc.xref.WAIS.1"><cite title="WAIS Interface Protocol Prototype Functional Specification (v1.5)">[WAIS]</cite></a> protocols. In this way, HTTP allows basic hypermedia access to resources available from diverse applications.
    641647      </p>
     
    19361942      </p>
    19371943      <p id="rfc.section.11.p.5">Thanks to the "cave men" of Palo Alto. You know who you are.</p>
    1938       <p id="rfc.section.11.p.6">Jim Gettys (the editor of <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.2"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2616]</cite></a>) wishes particularly to thank Roy Fielding, the editor of <a href="#RFC2068" id="rfc.xref.RFC2068.5"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2068]</cite></a>, along with John Klensin, Jeff Mogul, Paul Leach, Dave Kristol, Koen Holtman, John Franks, Josh Cohen, Alex Hopmann, Scott
     1944      <p id="rfc.section.11.p.6">Jim Gettys (the editor of <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.3"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2616]</cite></a>) wishes particularly to thank Roy Fielding, the editor of <a href="#RFC2068" id="rfc.xref.RFC2068.5"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2068]</cite></a>, along with John Klensin, Jeff Mogul, Paul Leach, Dave Kristol, Koen Holtman, John Franks, Josh Cohen, Alex Hopmann, Scott
    19391945         Lawrence, and Larry Masinter for their help. And thanks go particularly to Jeff Mogul and Scott Lawrence for performing the
    19401946         "MUST/MAY/SHOULD" audit.
     
    23812387      <h2 id="rfc.section.E.1"><a href="#rfc.section.E.1">E.1</a>&nbsp;Since RFC2616
    23822388      </h2>
    2383       <p id="rfc.section.E.1.p.1">Extracted relevant partitions from <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.3"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2616]</cite></a>.
     2389      <p id="rfc.section.E.1.p.1">Extracted relevant partitions from <a href="#RFC2616" id="rfc.xref.RFC2616.4"><cite title="Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1">[RFC2616]</cite></a>.
    23842390      </p>
    23852391      <h2 id="rfc.section.E.2"><a href="#rfc.section.E.2">E.2</a>&nbsp;Since draft-ietf-httpbis-p1-messaging-00
     
    26712677                  <li class="indline1"><em>RFC1808</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC1808.1">3.2.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC1808.2">3.2.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC1808"><b>12.2</b></a></li>
    26722678                  <li class="indline1"><em>RFC1900</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC1900.1">3.2.2</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC1900.2">10.4</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC1900"><b>12.2</b></a></li>
    2673                   <li class="indline1"><em>RFC1945</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC1945.1">1.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC1945"><b>12.2</b></a></li>
     2679                  <li class="indline1"><em>RFC1945</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC1945.1">1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC1945"><b>12.2</b></a></li>
    26742680                  <li class="indline1"><em>RFC2045</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC2045.1">1.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC2045.2">3.4</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC2045.3">11</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC2045"><b>12.1</b></a></li>
    26752681                  <li class="indline1"><em>RFC2047</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC2047.1">2.2</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC2047"><b>12.1</b></a></li>
     
    26852691                     </ul>
    26862692                  </li>
    2687                   <li class="indline1"><em>RFC2616</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.1">1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.2">11</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC2616"><b>12.2</b></a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.3">E.1</a></li>
     2693                  <li class="indline1"><em>RFC2616</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.1">1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.2">1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.3">11</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC2616"><b>12.2</b></a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC2616.4">E.1</a></li>
    26882694                  <li class="indline1"><em>RFC2821</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC2821.1">1.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC2821"><b>12.2</b></a></li>
    26892695                  <li class="indline1"><em>RFC2822</em>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC2822.1">1.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC2822.2">4.1</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC2822.3">4.2</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC2822.4">8.3</a>, <a class="iref" href="#rfc.xref.RFC2822.5">8.9</a>, <a class="iref" href="#RFC2822"><b>12.2</b></a><ul class="ind">
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