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4HTTPbis Working Group                                         J. Reschke
5Internet-Draft                                                greenbytes
6Updates: 2616 (if approved)                           September 22, 2010
7Intended status: Standards Track
8Expires: March 26, 2011
9
10
11           Use of the Content-Disposition Header Field in the
12                   Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP)
13                   draft-ietf-httpbis-content-disp-02
14
15Abstract
16
17   HTTP/1.1 defines the Content-Disposition response header field, but
18   points out that it is not part of the HTTP/1.1 Standard.  This
19   specification takes over the definition and registration of Content-
20   Disposition, as used in HTTP, and clarifies internationalization
21   aspects.
22
23Editorial Note (To be removed by RFC Editor before publication)
24
25   This specification is expected to replace the definition of Content-
26   Disposition in the HTTP/1.1 specification, as currently revised by
27   the IETF HTTPbis working group.  See also
28   <http://trac.tools.ietf.org/wg/httpbis/trac/ticket/123>.
29
30   Discussion of this draft should take place on the HTTPBIS working
31   group mailing list (ietf-http-wg@w3.org).  The current issues list is
32   at <http://trac.tools.ietf.org/wg/httpbis/trac/
33   query?component=content-disp> and related documents (including fancy
34   diffs) can be found at <http://tools.ietf.org/wg/httpbis/>.
35
36   The changes in this draft are summarized in Appendix D.6.
37
38Status of This Memo
39
40   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
41   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.
42
43   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
44   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
45   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
46   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.
47
48   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
49   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
50   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
51   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
52
53
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57Internet-Draft         Content-Disposition in HTTP        September 2010
58
59
60   This Internet-Draft will expire on March 26, 2011.
61
62Copyright Notice
63
64   Copyright (c) 2010 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
65   document authors.  All rights reserved.
66
67   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
68   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
69   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
70   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
71   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
72   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
73   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
74   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
75   described in the Simplified BSD License.
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113Internet-Draft         Content-Disposition in HTTP        September 2010
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115
116Table of Contents
117
118   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
119   2.  Notational Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
120   3.  Header Field Definition  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
121     3.1.  Grammar  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
122     3.2.  Disposition Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
123     3.3.  Disposition Parameter: 'Filename'  . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
124     3.4.  Disposition Parameter: Extensions  . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
125     3.5.  Extensibility  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
126   4.  Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
127   5.  Internationalization Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
128   6.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
129   7.  IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
130     7.1.  Registry for Disposition Values and Parameter  . . . . . .  8
131     7.2.  Header Field Registration  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
132   8.  Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
133   9.  References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
134     9.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
135     9.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
136   Appendix A.  Changes from the RFC 2616 Definition  . . . . . . . . 10
137   Appendix B.  Differences compared to RFC 2183  . . . . . . . . . . 10
138   Appendix C.  Alternative Approaches to Internationalization  . . . 10
139     C.1.  RFC 2047 Encoding  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
140     C.2.  Percent Encoding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
141     C.3.  Encoding Sniffing  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
142     C.4.  Implementations (to be removed by RFC Editor before
143           publication) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
144   Appendix D.  Change Log (to be removed by RFC Editor before
145                publication)  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
146     D.1.  Since draft-reschke-rfc2183-in-http-00 . . . . . . . . . . 12
147     D.2.  Since draft-reschke-rfc2183-in-http-01 . . . . . . . . . . 12
148     D.3.  Since draft-reschke-rfc2183-in-http-02 . . . . . . . . . . 12
149     D.4.  Since draft-reschke-rfc2183-in-http-03 . . . . . . . . . . 12
150     D.5.  Since draft-ietf-httpbis-content-disp-00 . . . . . . . . . 12
151     D.6.  Since draft-ietf-httpbis-content-disp-01 . . . . . . . . . 13
152   Index  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
153
154
155
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171
1721.  Introduction
173
174   HTTP/1.1 defines the Content-Disposition response header field in
175   Section 19.5.1 of [RFC2616], but points out that it is not part of
176   the HTTP/1.1 Standard (Section 15.5):
177
178      Content-Disposition is not part of the HTTP standard, but since it
179      is widely implemented, we are documenting its use and risks for
180      implementers.
181
182   This specification takes over the definition and registration of
183   Content-Disposition, as used in HTTP.  Based on interoperability
184   testing with existing User Agents, it fully defines a profile of the
185   features defined in the Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME)
186   variant ([RFC2183]) of the header field, and also clarifies
187   internationalization aspects.
188
1892.  Notational Conventions
190
191   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
192   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
193   document are to be interpreted as described in [RFC2119].
194
195   This specification uses the augmented BNF notation defined in Section
196   2.1 of [RFC2616], including its rules for linear whitespace (LWS).
197
1983.  Header Field Definition
199
200   The Content-Disposition response header field is used to convey
201   additional information about how to process the response payload, and
202   also can be used to attach additional metadata, such as the filename
203   to use when saving the response payload locally.
204
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227
2283.1.  Grammar
229
230     content-disposition = "Content-Disposition" ":"
231                            disposition-type *( ";" disposition-parm )
232
233     disposition-type    = "inline" | "attachment" | disp-ext-type
234                         ; case-insensitive
235     disp-ext-type       = token
236
237     disposition-parm    = filename-parm | disp-ext-parm
238
239     filename-parm       = "filename" "=" value
240                         | "filename*" "=" ext-value
241
242     disp-ext-parm       = token "=" value
243                         | ext-token "=" ext-value
244     ext-token           = <the characters in token, followed by "*">
245
246   Defined in [RFC2616]:
247
248     token       = <token, defined in [RFC2616], Section 2.2>
249     value       = <value, defined in [RFC2616], Section 3.6>
250
251   Defined in [RFC5987]:
252
253     ext-value   = <ext-value, defined in [RFC5987], Section 3.2>
254
2553.2.  Disposition Type
256
257   If the disposition type matches "attachment" (case-insensitively),
258   this indicates that the user agent should prompt the user to save the
259   response locally, rather than process it normally (as per its media
260   type).
261
262   On the other hand, if it matches "inline" (case-insensitively), this
263   implies default processing.
264
265   Unknown or unhandled disposition types SHOULD be handled the same way
266   as "attachment" (see also [RFC2183], Section 2.8).
267
2683.3.  Disposition Parameter: 'Filename'
269
270   The parameters "filename" and "filename*", to be matched case-
271   insensitively, provide information on how to construct a filename for
272   storing the message payload.
273
274   Depending on the disposition type, this information might be used
275   right away (in the "save as..." interaction caused for the
276
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283
284   "attachment" disposition type), or later on (for instance, when the
285   user decides to save the contents of the current page being
286   displayed).
287
288   The parameters "filename" and "filename*" differ only in that
289   "filename*" uses the encoding defined in [RFC5987], allowing the use
290   of characters not present in the ISO-8859-1 character set
291   ([ISO-8859-1]).
292
293   Many user agent implementations predating this specification do not
294   understand the "filename*" parameter.  Therefore, when both
295   "filename" and "filename*" are present in a single header field
296   value, recipients SHOULD pick "filename*" and ignore "filename".
297   This way, senders can avoid special-casing specific user agents by
298   sending both the more expressive "filename*" parameter, and the
299   "filename" parameter as fallback for legacy recipients (see Section 4
300   for an example).
301
302   It is essential that user agents treat the specified filename as
303   advisory only, thus be very careful in extracting the desired
304   information.  In particular:
305
306   o  When the value contains path separator characters, all but the
307      last segment SHOULD be ignored.  This prevents unintentional
308      overwriting of well-known file system location (such as "/etc/
309      passwd").
310
311   o  Many platforms do not use Internet Media Types ([RFC2046]) to hold
312      type information in the file system, but rely on filename
313      extensions instead.  Trusting the server-provided file extension
314      could introduce a privilege escalation when the saved file is
315      later opened (consider ".exe").  Thus, recipients need to ensure
316      that a file extension is used that is safe, optimally matching the
317      media type of the received payload.
318
319   o  Other aspects recipients need to be aware of are names that have a
320      special meaning in the file system or in shell commands, such as
321      "." and "..", "~", "|", and also device names.
322
3233.4.  Disposition Parameter: Extensions
324
325   To enable future extensions, unknown parameters SHOULD be ignored
326   (see also [RFC2183], Section 2.8).
327
3283.5.  Extensibility
329
330   Note that Section 9 of [RFC2183] defines IANA registries both for
331   disposition types and disposition parameters.  This registry is
332
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339
340   shared by different protocols using Content-Disposition, such as MIME
341   and HTTP.  Therefore, not all registered values may make sense in the
342   context of HTTP.
343
3444.  Examples
345
346   Direct UA to show "save as" dialog, with a filename of
347   "example.html":
348
349   Content-Disposition: Attachment; filename=example.html
350
351   Direct UA to behave as if the Content-Disposition header field wasn't
352   present, but to remember the filename "example.html" for a subsequent
353   save operation:
354
355     Content-Disposition: INLINE; FILENAME= "example.html"
356
357   Direct UA to show "save as" dialog, with a filename of "an example":
358
359   Content-Disposition: Attachment; Filename*=UTF-8'en'an%20example
360
361   Note that this example uses the extended encoding defined in
362   [RFC5987] to specify that the natural language of the filename is
363   English, and also to encode the space character which is not allowed
364   in the token production.
365
366   Direct UA to show "save as" dialog, with a filename containing the
367   Unicode character U+20AC (EURO SIGN):
368
369     Content-Disposition: attachment;
370                          filename*= UTF-8''%e2%82%ac%20rates
371
372   Here, the encoding defined in [RFC5987] is also used to encode the
373   non-ISO-8859-1 character.
374
375   Same as above, but adding the "filename" parameter for compatibility
376   with user agents not implementing RFC 5987:
377
378     Content-Disposition: attachment;
379                          filename="EURO rates";
380                          filename*=utf-8''%e2%82%ac%20rates
381
382   Note: as of September 2010, those user agents that do not support the
383   RFC 5987 encoding ignore "filename*" when it occurs after "filename".
384   Unfortunately, some user agents that do support RFC 5987 do pick the
385   "filename" rather than the "filename*" parameter when it occurs
386   first; it is expected that this situation is going to improve soon.
387
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395
3965.  Internationalization Considerations
397
398   The "filename*" parameter (Section 3.3), using the encoding defined
399   in [RFC5987], allows the server to transmit characters outside the
400   ISO-8859-1 character set, and also to optionally specify the language
401   in use.
402
403   Future parameters might also require internationalization, in which
404   case the same encoding can be used.
405
4066.  Security Considerations
407
408   Using server-supplied information for constructing local filenames
409   introduces many risks.  These are summarized in Section 3.3.
410
411   Furthermore, implementers also ought to be aware of the Security
412   Considerations applying to HTTP (see Section 15 of [RFC2616]), and
413   also the parameter encoding defined in [RFC5987] (see Section 5).
414
4157.  IANA Considerations
416
4177.1.  Registry for Disposition Values and Parameter
418
419   This specification does not introduce any changes to the registration
420   procedures for disposition values and parameters that are defined in
421   Section 9 of [RFC2183].
422
4237.2.  Header Field Registration
424
425   This document updates the definition of the Content-Disposition HTTP
426   header field in the permanent HTTP header field registry (see
427   [RFC3864]).
428
429   Header field name:  Content-Disposition
430
431   Applicable protocol:  http
432
433   Status:  standard
434
435   Author/Change controller:  IETF
436
437   Specification document:  this specification (Section 3)
438
4398.  Acknowledgements
440
441   Thanks to Rolf Eike Beer, Bjoern Hoehrmann, Alfred Hoenes, Roar
442   Lauritzsen, Henrik Nordstrom, and Mark Nottingham for their valuable
443   feedback.
444
445
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451
4529.  References
453
4549.1.  Normative References
455
456   [ISO-8859-1]  International Organization for Standardization,
457                 "Information technology -- 8-bit single-byte coded
458                 graphic character sets -- Part 1: Latin alphabet No.
459                 1", ISO/IEC 8859-1:1998, 1998.
460
461   [RFC2119]     Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
462                 Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.
463
464   [RFC2616]     Fielding, R., Gettys, J., Mogul, J., Frystyk, H.,
465                 Masinter, L., Leach, P., and T. Berners-Lee, "Hypertext
466                 Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1", RFC 2616, June 1999.
467
468   [RFC5987]     Reschke, J., "Character Set and Language Encoding for
469                 Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) Header Field
470                 Parameters", RFC 5987, August 2010.
471
4729.2.  Informative References
473
474   [RFC2046]     Freed, N. and N. Borenstein, "Multipurpose Internet
475                 Mail Extensions (MIME) Part Two: Media Types",
476                 RFC 2046, November 1996.
477
478   [RFC2047]     Moore, K., "MIME (Multipurpose Internet Mail
479                 Extensions) Part Three: Message Header Extensions for
480                 Non-ASCII Text", RFC 2047, November 1996.
481
482   [RFC2183]     Troost, R., Dorner, S., and K. Moore, "Communicating
483                 Presentation Information in Internet Messages: The
484                 Content-Disposition Header Field", RFC 2183,
485                 August 1997.
486
487   [RFC2231]     Freed, N. and K. Moore, "MIME Parameter Value and
488                 Encoded Word Extensions: Character Sets, Languages, and
489                 Continuations", RFC 2231, November 1997.
490
491   [RFC3629]     Yergeau, F., "UTF-8, a transformation format of ISO
492                 10646", STD 63, RFC 3629, November 2003.
493
494   [RFC3864]     Klyne, G., Nottingham, M., and J. Mogul, "Registration
495                 Procedures for Message Header Fields", BCP 90,
496                 RFC 3864, September 2004.
497
498   [RFC3986]     Berners-Lee, T., Fielding, R., and L. Masinter,
499                 "Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax",
500
501
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507
508                 STD 66, RFC 3986, January 2005.
509
510Appendix A.  Changes from the RFC 2616 Definition
511
512   Compared to Section 19.5.1 of [RFC2616], the following normative
513   changes reflecting actual implementations have been made:
514
515   o  According to RFC 2616, the disposition type "attachment" only
516      applies to content of type "application/octet-stream".  This
517      restriction has been removed, because user agents in practice do
518      not check the content type, and it also discourages properly
519      declaring the media type.
520
521   o  RFC 2616 only allows "quoted-string" for the filename parameter.
522      This would be an exceptional parameter syntax, and also doesn't
523      reflect actual use.
524
525   o  The definition for the disposition type "inline" ([RFC2183],
526      Section 2.1) has been re-added with a suggestion for its
527      processing.
528
529   o  This specification requires support for the extended parameter
530      encoding defined in [RFC5987].
531
532Appendix B.  Differences compared to RFC 2183
533
534   Section 2 of [RFC2183] defines several additional disposition
535   parameters: "creation-date", "modification-date", "quoted-date-time",
536   and "size".  These do not appear to be implemented by any user agent,
537   thus have been omitted from this specification.
538
539Appendix C.  Alternative Approaches to Internationalization
540
541   By default, HTTP header field parameters cannot carry characters
542   outside the ISO-8859-1 ([ISO-8859-1]) character encoding (see
543   [RFC2616], Section 2.2).  For the "filename" parameter, this of
544   course is an unacceptable restriction.
545
546   Unfortunately, user agent implementers have not managed to come up
547   with an interoperable approach, although the IETF Standards Track
548   specifies exactly one solution ([RFC2231], clarified and profiled for
549   HTTP in [RFC5987]).
550
551   For completeness, the sections below describe the various approaches
552   that have been tried, and explains how they are inferior to the RFC
553   5987 encoding used in this specification.
554
555
556
557
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563
564C.1.  RFC 2047 Encoding
565
566   RFC 2047 defines an encoding mechanism for header fields, but this
567   encoding is not supposed to be used for header field parameters - see
568   Section 5 of [RFC2047]:
569
570      An 'encoded-word' MUST NOT appear within a 'quoted-string'.
571
572      ...
573
574      An 'encoded-word' MUST NOT be used in parameter of a MIME Content-
575      Type or Content-Disposition field, or in any structured field body
576      except within a 'comment' or 'phrase'.
577
578   In practice, some user agents implement the encoding, some do not
579   (exposing the encoded string to the user), and some get confused by
580   it.
581
582C.2.  Percent Encoding
583
584   Some user agents accept percent encoded ([RFC3986], Section 2.1)
585   sequences of characters encoded using the UTF-8 ([RFC3629]) character
586   encoding.
587
588   In practice, this is hard to use because those user agents that do
589   not support it will display the escaped character sequence to the
590   user.
591
592   Furthermore, the first user agent to implement this did choose the
593   encoding based on local settings; thus making it very hard to use in
594   multi-lingual environments.
595
596C.3.  Encoding Sniffing
597
598   Some user agents inspect the value (which defaults to ISO-8859-1) and
599   switch to UTF-8 when it seems to be more likely to be the correct
600   interpretation.
601
602   As with the approaches above, this is not interoperable and
603   furthermore risks misinterpreting the actual value.
604
605C.4.  Implementations (to be removed by RFC Editor before publication)
606
607   Unfortunately, as of September 2010, neither the encoding defined in
608   RFCs 2231 and 5987, nor any of the alternate approaches discussed
609   above was implemented interoperably.  Thus, this specification
610   recommends the approach defined in RFC 5987, which at least has the
611   advantage of actually being specified properly.
612
613
614
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616
617Internet-Draft         Content-Disposition in HTTP        September 2010
618
619
620   The table below shows the implementation support for the various
621   approaches:
622
623   +---------------+------------+--------+--------------+--------------+
624   | User Agent    | RFC        | RFC    | Percent      | Encoding     |
625   |               | 2231/5987  | 2047   | Encoding     | Sniffing     |
626   +---------------+------------+--------+--------------+--------------+
627   | Chrome        | no         | yes    | yes          | yes          |
628   | Firefox       | yes (*)    | yes    | no           | yes          |
629   | Internet      | no         | no     | yes          | no           |
630   | Explorer      |            |        |              |              |
631   | Konqueror     | yes        | no     | no           | no           |
632   | Opera         | yes (*)    | no     | no           | no           |
633   | Safari        | no         | no     | no           | yes          |
634   +---------------+------------+--------+--------------+--------------+
635
636   (*) Does not implement the fallback behavior to "filename" described
637   in Section 3.3.
638
639Appendix D.  Change Log (to be removed by RFC Editor before publication)
640
641D.1.  Since draft-reschke-rfc2183-in-http-00
642
643   Adjust terminology ("header" -> "header field").  Update rfc2231-in-
644   http reference.
645
646D.2.  Since draft-reschke-rfc2183-in-http-01
647
648   Update rfc2231-in-http reference.  Actually define the "filename"
649   parameter.  Add internationalization considerations.  Add examples
650   using the RFC 5987 encoding.  Add overview over other approaches,
651   plus a table reporting implementation status.  Add and resolve issue
652   "nodep2183".  Add issues "asciivsiso", "deplboth", "quoted", and
653   "registry".
654
655D.3.  Since draft-reschke-rfc2183-in-http-02
656
657   Add and close issue "docfallback".  Close issues "asciivsiso",
658   "deplboth", "quoted", and "registry".
659
660D.4.  Since draft-reschke-rfc2183-in-http-03
661
662   Updated to be a Working Draft of the IETF HTTPbis Working Group.
663
664D.5.  Since draft-ietf-httpbis-content-disp-00
665
666   Closed issues:
667
668
669
670
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672
673Internet-Draft         Content-Disposition in HTTP        September 2010
674
675
676   o  <http://tools.ietf.org/wg/httpbis/trac/ticket/242>: "handling of
677      unknown disposition types"
678
679   Slightly updated the notes about the proposed fallback behavior.
680
681D.6.  Since draft-ietf-httpbis-content-disp-01
682
683   None yet.
684
685Index
686
687   C
688      Content-Disposition header  4
689
690   H
691      Headers
692         Content-Disposition  4
693
694Author's Address
695
696   Julian F. Reschke
697   greenbytes GmbH
698   Hafenweg 16
699   Muenster, NW  48155
700   Germany
701
702   EMail: julian.reschke@greenbytes.de
703   URI:   http://greenbytes.de/tech/webdav/
704
705
706
707
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709
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715
716
717
718
719
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726
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